Medici

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Med·i·ci

 (mĕd′ə-chē′, mĕ′dē-)
Italian noble family that produced three popes (Leo X, Clement VII, and Leo XI) and two queens of France (Catherine de Médicis and Marie de Médicis). Cosimo "the Elder" (1389-1464) was the first of the family to rule Florence. Lorenzo "the Magnificent" (1449-1492) was an outstanding patron of learning and the arts, whose clients included Michelangelo and Botticelli.

Med′i·ce′an (-chē′ən, -sē′-) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Medici

(ˈmɛdɪtʃɪ; məˈdiːtʃɪ; Italian ˈmɛːditʃi)
n
1. (Biography) an Italian family of bankers, merchants, and rulers of Florence and Tuscany, prominent in Italian political and cultural history in the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries, including
2. (Biography) Catherine de'. See Catherine de' Medici
3. (Biography) Cosimo I (ˈkɔːzimo), known as Cosimo the Great. 1519–74, duke of Florence and first grand duke of Tuscany (1569–74)
4. (Biography) Cosimo de', known as Cosimo the Elder. 1389–1464, Italian banker, statesman, and patron of arts, who established the political power of the family in Florence (1434)
5. (Biography) Giovanni de'. See Leo X
6. (Biography) Giulio de'. See Clement VII
7. (Biography) Lorenzo de' (loˈrɛntso de), known as Lorenzo the Magnificent. 1449–92, Italian statesman, poet, and scholar; ruler of Florence (1469–92) and first patron of Michelangelo
8. (Biography) Maria de'. See Maria de' Medici
French name: Médicis
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Med•i•ci

(ˈmɛd ɪ tʃi)

n.
1. Catherine de'. Catherine de Médicis.
2. Cosmo or Cosimode' ( “the Elder” ), 1389–1464, Italian banker and statesman.
3. Cosmo or Cosimode' ( “the Great” ), 1519–74, first grand duke of Tuscany.
4. Giovanni de', Leo X.
5. Giulio de', Clement VII.
6. Lorenzo de' ( “the Magnificent” ), 1449–92, ruler of Florence 1478–92.
7. Maria de', Marie de Médicis.
Med`i•ce′an (-ˈsi ən, -ˈtʃi ən) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Medici - aristocratic Italian family of powerful merchants and bankers who ruled Florence in the 15th centuryMedici - aristocratic Italian family of powerful merchants and bankers who ruled Florence in the 15th century
house - aristocratic family line; "the House of York"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
It would be the Venus de' Medici placed beside a milliner's doll.
Rare birds, retaining their most brilliant plumage, enormous fish, spread upon massive silver dishes, together with every wine produced in the Archipelago, Asia Minor, or the Cape, sparkling in bottles, whose grotesque shape seemed to give an additional flavor to the draught, -- all these, like one of the displays with which Apicius of old gratified his guests, passed in review before the eyes of the astonished Parisians, who understood that it was possible to expend a thousand louis upon a dinner for ten persons, but only on the condition of eating pearls, like Cleopatra, or drinking refined gold, like Lorenzo de' Medici.
Hers was a Norman beauty, fresh, high-colored, redundant, the flesh of Rubens covering the muscles of the Farnese Hercules, and not the slender articulations of the Venus de' Medici, Apollo's graceful consort.
Prince Lorenzo de' Medici, a member of Italian banking family, House of Medici, has opened a bank in Puerto Rico.
Lorenz Boninger's essay, "Lorenzo de' Medici and Foreigners: Recommendations and Reprisals," is an examination of immigration in fifteenth-century Florence, and Lorenzo the Magnificent's role as intermediary of disputes and reprisals.
Martone, Eric (2018) "Book Review: The Black Prince of Florence: The Spectacular Life and Treacherous World of Alessandro de' Medici by Catherine Fletcher," International Social Science Review: Vol.
This wide-ranging book offers 22 essays mostly on the political rule of Cosimo, Piero, and Lorenzo de' Medici. All of the uniformly high quality essays in the book are written by well-established scholars from both sides of the Atlantic.
In a compelling afterword to this cinematic retelling of the history of Florence's first Renaissance duke, Catherine Fletcher reconstructs the fortune of Alessandro de' Medici's ethnicity over the centuries since his death.
The 31-year-old who played Cosimo de' Medici in Medici: Masters of Florence, opposite Dustin Hoffman, said he has had enough of costume dramas.
The Grand Ducal volume begins with Stefano d'Aglio's chapter on the assassination of Lorenzino de' Medici, the assassin of his cousin, Duke Alessandro de' Medici.
In 1492, Lorenzo de' Medici asked Savonarola to come to Florence when he was dying, and Savonarola took the opportunity to take over the city when the Medici fled due to the invasion of France.
Catherine de' Medici, an Italian noblewoman who was Queen of France from 1547 until 1559, tasked the Italian landscape architect Bernard de Carnesse with building the garden in line with the Italian Renaissance style between the Seine river in the south, the rue Saint-Honore in the north, the Louvre in the east and the city walls in the west.