deaconess

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dea·con·ess

 (dē′kə-nĭs)
n.
1. A laywoman serving as assistant to a Protestant minister.
2. Used as a title prefixed to the surname of such a woman: Deaconess Brown.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

deaconess

(ˈdiːkənɪs)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity (in the early church and in some modern Churches) a female member of the laity with duties similar to those of a deacon
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dea•con•ess

(ˈdi kə nɪs)

n.
(in certain Protestant churches) a woman belonging to an order dedicated to social services.
[1530–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deaconess - a woman deacon
deacon, Protestant deacon - a Protestant layman who assists the minister
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

deaconess

[ˈdiːkənes] Ndiaconisa f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

deaconess

nDiakonin f; (= elder)Kirchenälteste f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

deaconess

[ˈdiːkənɛs] ndiaconessa
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Ayokunle said this during the dedication and ordination of the first set of deacons and deaconesses of Glory Baptist church, Wakajaye, Iyana Church, Ibadan, Oyo State.
Deaconesses, including Kristin Wassalik, director of Deaconess Program, Concordia University; Lisa Molotla, Immanuel, Des Plaines; Rogene Lis, Trinity, Roselle; and Dianna Bonfield, Lutheran Church Charities volunteer coordinator, joined O'Day for her installation and the pinning ceremony.
THE TWELFTH AND THIRTEENTH CENTURIES have become increasingly prominent in the ongoing ecclesial debate over deaconesses. The importance of this period is due in large part to the immense effort of medieval schoolmen to better understand the sacrament of holy orders.
(This essay establishes the rationale for the publication of the text of the intervention.) Vagaggini's scholarship is sound: he marshals evidence on the role of deaconesses from church orders (Didascalia and Apostolic Constitutions), the late fourth-century writings of Epiphanius of Salamis, and the Byzantine rite of ordination from the earliest extant euchological evidence of Constantinopolitan provenance.
Drawing on a wealth of German, American, British, French, and Syrian sources, mainly comprised of letters written by Beirut deaconesses to their superiors in Germany, Hauser examines the Kaiserwerth deaconesses (est.
It was dedicated to 94-year-old Professor Emeritus Evangelos Theodorou, who sixty years ago was the first among Orthodox theologians to initiate scholarly discussion on the ordination of Deaconesses to the Sacramental Priesthood in the Orthodox Church.
Fliedners charitable work quickly grew to include a Christian kindergarten, an orphanage, a girls high school, a home for mentally ill female Protestants, a home for invalid or lonely women, a school for teachers, and a training school for deaconesses. The Kaiserswerth-based Institution of Protestant Deaconesses also purchased and staffed hospitals, homes, orphanages, and schools in other parts of Germany and around the world.
He begins by explaining that "Religious historians and sociologists of religion have participated in a vigorous debate since the 1960s over how to explain the apparent decline of religion in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Europe." This debate is the focus of his research, and he engages with it by exploring the expansion of influence of deaconesses in 19th-century Sweden--an expansion demonstrating that "the adoption of social functions by more specialized institutions and professionals did not necessarily push religious institutions and professionals to the margins of society." He frames the context of their activities and looks closely at education, health care, and poor relief in medieval and early modern Europe.
ABSTRACT: In Lutheran Germany, parish nursing traditionally constituted the deaconesses' principal work.
Established in 1908 by action of the 34th General Assembly, Diaconal Ministries was founded to "take steps to set apart an order of women who shall be known as deaconesses; who shall serve the church as nurses, parish visitors, dispensers of charity and in any other way that may prove desirable," as well as "approve at the same time some method by which graduates may be specifically designated by the Church when entering their work."
(47) While the institution did not abandon this original goal, it soon shifted its focus to training teachers, partly because its first director, Marie Cederschiold, was-herself a former schoolteacher who saw a need in society that she believed deaconesses could help meet.
Marjorie Wilkinson and Ethel Helyar, two nursing deaconesses, set out to cover 90,000 square kilometres in the NSW and Queensland Outback, to provide free health and pastoral care to all in need.