necrosis

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ne·cro·sis

 (nə-krō′sĭs, nĕ-)
n. pl. ne·cro·ses (-sēz′)
Death of cells through injury or disease, especially in a localized area of a tissue or organ.

[Late Latin necrōsis, a causing to die, killing, from Greek nekrōsis, death, from nekroun, to make dead, from nekros, corpse; see nek- in Indo-European roots.]

ne·crot′ic (-krŏt′ĭk) adj.

necrosis

(nɛˈkrəʊsɪs)
n
1. (Pathology) the death of one or more cells in the body, usually within a localized area, as from an interruption of the blood supply to that part
2. (Botany) death of plant tissue due to disease, frost, etc
[C17: New Latin from Greek nekrōsis, from nekroun to kill, from nekros corpse]
necrotic adj

ne•cro•sis

(nəˈkroʊ sɪs)

n.
death of a circumscribed portion of animal or plant tissue.
[1655–65; < New Latin < Greek nékrōsis state of death = nekrō-, variant s. of nekroûn to kill, mortify]
ne•crot′ic (-ˈkrɒt ɪk) adj.
nec•ro•tize (ˈnɛk rəˌtaɪz) v.i., v.t. -tized, -tiz•ing.

necrosis

the death or decay of body tissue, the result of loss of blood supply or trauma. — necrotic, adj.
See also: Body, Human
the death or decay of body tissue, the result of loss of blood supply or trauma. — necrotic, adj.
See also: Death, Decaying
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.necrosis - the localized death of living cells (as from infection or the interruption of blood supply)necrosis - the localized death of living cells (as from infection or the interruption of blood supply)
death - the permanent end of all life functions in an organism or part of an organism; "the animal died a painful death"
myonecrosis - localized death of muscle cell fibers
Translations
nekroosi
afstervingnecrose

necrosis

[nɛˈkrəʊsɪs] nnécrose f

necrosis

[nɛˈkrəʊsɪs] nnecrosi f inv

necrosis

n necrosis f
References in classic literature ?
He gets a dry, hacking cough as the dead tissue sloughs away, and dies the following summer of pneumonia, wondering what it's all about.
Inflammation plays a role in fighting infection and helps clear away dead tissue.
The mainstays of treatment are still debridement (meticulous removal of necrotic or dead tissue), antibiotic coverage, delayed wound closure and internal fixation (the application of hardware such as nails, screws, plates and wires).
He had just undergone a surgery to remove dead tissue and muscle from what is left of his lower extremities.
He had further surgery to remove dead tissue and muscle from his leg amputations, and, this week, he will have two more surgeries to remove dead tissue.
He added, 'We researched whether blood pressure in later life was associated with signs of brain aging that include plaques and tangles linked to Alzheimer's disease, and brain lesions called infarcts, areas of dead tissue caused by a blockage of the blood supply, which can increase with age, often go undetected and can lead to stroke.' Healthy blood pressure is less than 120/80 millimetres of mercury (mmHg).
These are "areas of dead tissue caused by a blockage of the blood supply, which can increase with age, often go undetected, and can lead to stroke." Included in the study were almost 1,300 people who were followed until their deaths, which was an average of 8 years from the beginning of the study.
Scar tissue is dead tissue and such areas will not regain function after angioplasty or bypass operation.
TMS-007 is a small molecule which has previously demonstrated an acceptable safety profile in a Phase 1 study and has also reduced infarct volume (area of dead tissue resulting from failure of blood supply) in experimental rodent and primate embolic and thrombotic stroke models.
She required two surgeries to remove dead tissue caused by the infection.
Healthy tissue is moist and creamy white in appearance, while dead tissue would be brown and dry.