deadhouse


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deadhouse

(ˈdɛdˌhaʊs)
n
a mortuary
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Lest we forget A laugh and a joke Over a "pint or two" Or Rum and Coke Outside The Knobhill Or Jessies is worse No sign of a dray Just a black hearse Best times I recall In The Lothian or Mount All laughing, singing And just messing about Unlike Mill Street The Eastern or Sams The Deadhouse, The Wellie And drinking wee drams Now I sit in the bar Cringing with fear You can all understand That "tear" in my beer By Billy, L8
One especially illustrative example is his use of the word "jhistal" in Deadhouse Gates (2000).
A DLMB Production in association with Deadhouse Films, Sammy is written and directed by Dana-Lee Mierowsky Bennett and produced by Rachele Wiggins with Executive Producer Enzo Tedeschi.
The sequel, Deadhouse Gates, is currently available and at least two more titles in the series are forthcoming.
The Deadhouse Linda Fairstein Time Warner Paperbacks pounds 6.99
In the meantime, the customized hearse had been pulling up to the deadhouse for its daily collection, driven by John Donohoe for $60 a month.
Key witnesses to significant events abound throughout all ten volumes of the Malazan series, including the Imperial historian Duiker who, not unlike a twenty-first-century embedded journalist, witnesses Wickan Crow Clan leader Coltaine's impressive "Chain of Dogs" in Deadhouse Gates (2000); Samar Dev, who is similarly made witness to the bravado and awesome feats of the Toblakai barbarian Karsa Orlong; and the Tano Spiritwalker Kimloc, who immortalizes in song the legendary accomplishments of that other, more infamous Malazan military unit known as the Bridgeburners.
Let the events of the next day be written, lest history's lesson be lost to all who follow" (Deadhouse 255-6).
When the Seventh army is finally overtaken by the Whirlwind army outside Aren, surviving refugees of the Chain of Dogs and members of Aren's military guard watch from the city's walls "to witness" what Erikson's narration describes as "the greatest crime ever committed by a Malazan High Fist" (Deadhouse 546).
In a similar gesture, the Bonehunters later canonize the Chain of Dogs commander into their pantheon of war heroes by adopting a rather graphic and inspirational marching song entitled "Coltaine" (Deadhouse 388).
Kimloc offers to shape their story "into song" after Fiddler, originally a member of the Bridgeburners, saves Kimloc's granddaughters from being assaulted in Deadhouse Gates (65).