death benefit

(redirected from Death Benefits)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial.

death benefit

n.
Insurance money payable to a deceased person's stipulated beneficiary.

death′ ben`efit


n.
the amount of money payable to a beneficiary upon the death of the insured.
[1920–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.death benefit - insurance or pension money payable to a beneficiary of a deceased
benefit - financial assistance in time of need
advance death benefit - a percentage of death benefits paid directly to policy holders having a short life expectancy (usually 6 months)
References in periodicals archive ?
500,000 to the petitioners on account of accidental death benefits.
In addition to conventional legacy planning, this may be one of the reasons that firms have begun to offer optional death benefits as add-ons to IOVA products.
Automatically revoking a beneficiary designation, therefore, has no effect on the legally separated spouse's rights to death benefits under the qualified preretirement survivor annuity (QPSA) rules.
Those seeking to analyze the relationship between cash values and death benefits will find the IRR measurement a useful tool.
However, if the insured borrows or withdraws the cash value or uses any of the accelerated death benefits (that most plans offer) those amounts will be deducted from the final death benefit.
Death benefit Death Benefits are received generally
Policies that generate little cash value and are designed for longterm (lifetime) death benefits with a guaranteed minimum premium outlay.
Death benefits payable under contract, or pursuant to an established plan of the employer, are taxable income.
Biders such as accelerated death benefits allow terminally or chronically ill policyholders to get cash value out faster.
Variable annuities have long offered tax deferral, investment convenience through a range of investment options, death benefits, and the option of converting to a kind of personal pension plan.
The qualified direct cost of insured death benefits can be based on Table 2001, (1) or another acceptable method of determining the actual cost of the death benefit.
Unlike their predecessors, newer programs offer guaranteed death benefits for a given period and premium.