afterlife

(redirected from Death and immortality)
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af·ter·life

 (ăf′tər-līf′)
n.
1. A life or existence believed to follow death.
2. The part of one's life that follows a particular event.

afterlife

(ˈɑːftəˌlaɪf)
n
life after death or at a later time in a person's lifetime

af•ter•life

(ˈæf tərˌlaɪf, ˈɑf-)

n.
1. life after death.
2. the later part of a person's life, as following retirement.
[1585–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.afterlife - life after deathafterlife - life after death      
lifespan, lifetime, life-time, life - the period during which something is functional (as between birth and death); "the battery had a short life"; "he lived a long and happy life"
kingdom come - the next world; "he nearly blew us to kingdom come"
immortality - perpetual life after death

afterlife

noun life after death, heaven, paradise, nirvana (Buddhism, Hinduism), bliss, immortality, next world, Zion (Christianity), hereafter, Valhalla (Norse myth), Happy Valley, happy hunting ground (Native American legend), life to come, everlasting life, life everlasting, abode of God, Elysium or Elysian fields (Greek myth) The film is about proving the existence of an afterlife.

afterlife

noun
Translations

afterlife

[ˈɑːftəlaɪf] Nvida f de ultratumba

afterlife

[ˈɑːftərlaɪf] nvie f après la mort

afterlife

[ˈɑːftəˌlaɪf] nvita dell'al di là
References in periodicals archive ?
Death and immortality of man after death can be seen as the key concept of Christianity and the New Testament.
The Broken Scythe: Death and Immortality in the Works of J.
Having established this dual role of death, May concludes that 'both death and immortality are inimical to us' and considers this to be 'perhaps the most important dilemma facing human beings' (78).
Terrifying yet fascinating apparatuses have been conceived by, among others, Franz Kafka, Marcel Duchamp, Raymond Roussel, and Alfred Jarry, and in their "splendid ambiguity," he wrote in the show's catalogue, these machines stand for "the omnipotence of eroticism and its negation, for death and immortality, for torture and Disneyland, for fall and resurrection.
In Western traditions, by far the most popular way to think about death and immortality is shaped by the ancient and fundamental distinction between the physical body and the spiritual soul.