euthanasia

(redirected from Death with dignity)
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Related to Death with dignity: euthanasia, Dying With Dignity, Death with Dignity Act

eu·tha·na·sia

 (yo͞o′thə-nā′zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
The act or practice of ending the life of a person or animal having a terminal illness or a medical condition that causes suffering perceived as incompatible with an acceptable quality of life, as by lethal injection or the suspension of certain medical treatments.

[Greek euthanasiā, a good death : eu-, eu- + thanatos, death.]

euthanasia

(ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə) or

euthanasy

n
(Medicine) the act of killing someone painlessly, esp to relieve suffering from an incurable illness. Also called: mercy killing
[C17: via New Latin from Greek: easy death, from eu- + thanatos death]

eu•tha•na•sia

(ˌyu θəˈneɪ ʒə, -ʒi ə, -zi ə)

n.
Also called mercy killing. the act of putting to death painlessly or allowing to die, as by withholding medical measures from a person or animal suffering from an incurable, esp. a painful, disease or condition.
[1640–50; < New Latin < Greek euthanasía easy death]

euthanasia

1. the act of putting to death without pain a person incurably ill or suffering great pain; mercy killing.
2. an easy, painless death. — euthanasic, adj.
See also: Killing
the deliberate killing of painfully ill or terminally ill people to put them out of their misery. Also called mercy killing.
See also: Death
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.euthanasia - the act of killing someone painlessly (especially someone suffering from an incurable illness)euthanasia - the act of killing someone painlessly (especially someone suffering from an incurable illness)
kill, putting to death, killing - the act of terminating a life

euthanasia

noun mercy killing, assisted suicide the emotive question of whether euthanasia should be legalized
Translations
إماتَه رَحيمَه
eutanasimedlidenhedsdrab
eutanázia
líknardráp
eutanazijaneskausmingas numarinimas
eitanāzija
eutanázia
ötenazitatlı ölüm

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə] Neutanasia f

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪziə] neuthanasie f

euthanasia

nEuthanasie f

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə] neutanasia

euthanasia

(juːθəˈneiziə) noun
the painless killing of someone who is suffering from a painful and incurable illness. Many old people would prefer euthanasia to the suffering they have to endure.

eu·tha·na·si·a

n. eutanasia, muerte infringida sin sufrimiento en casos de una enfermedad incurable.

euthanasia

n eutanasia
References in periodicals archive ?
We hope that California will seize this poignant moment to adopt the proposal now before it to enact a death with dignity law.
The court agreed to hear the federal government's appeal of a lower court ruling that prevented the Drug Enforcement Administration from punishing doctors who prescribe lethal doses of drugs to terminally ill patients under Oregon's Death With Dignity Act.
I've read about living wills and death with dignity.
6 launch of Brittany's joint campaign with Compassion & Choices, 20 newspapers in 11 states have endorsed death with dignity, also known as the medical practice of aid in dying.
There is disagreement about what to call the thing that is authorized by Oregon's Death With Dignity Act.
The problems in reporting, tracking and investigating cases of euthanasia have been so persistent that the Oregon Health Service finally admitted in a report that it ``cannot determine whether physician assisted suicide is being practiced outside the framework of the Death With Dignity Act.
New footage examining the practical application of Oregon's Death with Dignity Act has just been edited for release.
This earlier study was conducted in response to the Supreme Court's decision to hear a challenge to Oregon's Death with Dignity act -- the nation's only law on behalf of physician assisted suicide -- the Louis Finkelstein Institute for Social and Religious Research and HCD Research conducted the survey of physicians during the last week of February.
19, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Compassion & Choices today launched a national initiative for expanded access to death with dignity on what would be Brittany Maynard's 30[sup.
Oregon public health officials, charged with producing an annual report on who is using the state's Death with Dignity Act, no longer will call the act "physician-assisted suicide," the term commonly used in medical literature, court filings and the news media since voters approved the law in 1994.
It's depression, not pain'' that has led to the suicides of some of the 171 patients in Oregon who have taken lethal doses since implementation of the Death with Dignity Act of 1997, Stevens said.
Oregon voters narrowly approved the Death with Dignity Act in 1994 and reaffirmed it in 1997.