capital punishment

(redirected from Death-penalty)
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capital punishment

n.
1. The penalty of death for the commission of a crime.
2. The practice or legal sanction of allowing the imposition of the penalty of death for people convicted of committing certain crimes.

capital punishment

n
(Law) the punishment of death for a crime; death penalty

cap′ital pun′ishment


n.
punishment by death for a crime; death penalty.
[1575–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.capital punishment - putting a condemned person to deathcapital punishment - putting a condemned person to death
corporal punishment - the infliction of physical injury on someone convicted of committing a crime
burning at the stake, burning - execution by fire
hanging - a form of capital punishment; victim is suspended by the neck from a gallows or gibbet until dead; "in those days the hanging of criminals was a public entertainment"
electrocution, burning - execution by electricity
beheading, decapitation - execution by cutting off the victim's head
crucifixion - the act of executing by a method widespread in the ancient world; the victim's hands and feet are bound or nailed to a cross
Translations
trest smrti
dødsstraf
kuolemanrangaistus
smrtna kazna
halálbüntetés
死刑
사형
smrtna kazen
dödsstraff
การลงโทษประหารชีวิต
án tử hình

capital punishment

npena capitale

capital punishment

عُقُوبَةُ الإعْدَام trest smrti dødsstraf Todesstrafe θανατική ποινή pena capital kuolemanrangaistus peine capitale smrtna kazna pena capitale 死刑 사형 doodstraf dødsstraff kara śmierci pena de morte смертная казнь dödsstraff การลงโทษประหารชีวิต idam cezası án tử hình 死刑
References in periodicals archive ?
(18.) See Robert Barnes, Gorsuch Casts Death-Penalty Vote in One of His First Supreme Court Cases, wash.
Gallup's death-penalty data stretch back more than seven decades -- making attitudes toward the death penalty one of Gallup's oldest trends.
This is why I am joining my friend Jim Wallis in a coalition of liberals and conservatives calling for a national moratorium and conversation about the death penalty, so people can study, learn, think, pray if they wish, about whether or how the various state death-penalty systems should be changed.