Deathliness


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Death´li`ness


n.1.The quality of being deathly; deadliness.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
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to the overwhelming deathliness of all archives, "You can hold onto
It is a practice that literalises the deathliness that has, from the very inception of sexology and psychiatry, been associated with the sterility of homosexuality and with the danger of the so-called sexual perversions or paraphilias.
In The Prophetic Imagination, Walter Brueggemann writes that one of the roles of the prophet is to "speak metaphorically about the real deathliness that hovers over us and gnaws within us, and to speak neither in rage nor with cheap grace, but with the candor born of anguish and passion" (45).
This displacement-replacement seems to project maternal deathliness away from Haze, but his efforts are futile.
his own private deathliness. As in the first line, he has been a futile pretender for most of the
2009 Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness. New Haven & London: Yale University Press.
Faulkner insistently calls attention to Veda's uncanny quality and her deathliness in scenes that seem to advance a vision of Veda as a repressed, threatening, and potentially fatal side to Mildred's own character.
More recently, however, it has been seen as emblematic of post-modern society at large, and both Caroline Evans' (2003) volume Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity, and Deathliness and Judith Clark's Malign Muses/Spectres (2004 to 2005) project celebrated the cannibalistic reincarnations of fashion as being illustrative of the logical conclusion of pervasive mercantile capitalism in all aspects of contemporary life.
If anything, the death wnmans him, impelling him to impose himself on the sleeping Gudrun and pour his sense of deathliness into her as the Magna Mater.
Lawrence, from whom he had become estranged but whose belief in the deathliness of 'machine civilisation' and the need for a revolution in consciousness he shared.
Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity, and Deathliness. New Haven: Yale UP, 2003.