debellation

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Related to Debellatio: Debellation

debellation

Obsolete, the process of conquering or defeating; achieving victory.
See also: Victory
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The Latin term most apropos here for describing the willful destruction of an enemy through wildly disproportionate and excessive retaliation is "debellatio" or "debellation" meaning the "defeating, or the act of conquering or subduing," literally "warring (the enemy) down", from Latin bellum "war").
The 1949 Geneva Conventions marked a definitive rejection of the concept of debellatio, under which the occupier assumed full sovereignty over the civilians in the occupied territory.
After debellatio of Papal States, from 1870 to 1929 the Holy See continued to exercise active and passive rights of legation and to conclude Concordats.
El derecho de ocupacion (42) esta constituido por un conjunto de normas de caracter consuetudinario (43) que regulan la conducta de fuerzas ocupantes en territorio extranjero siempre y cuando este ausente la debellatio (44), y tiene la finalidad de proteger los derechos fundamentales de la poblacion del territorio ocupado.
Japan and Germany were occupied under the legal principle of debellatio, which considers the right of conquest that no longer exists.
These methods include annexation, establishment of puppet regimes, debellatio (the principle that the conquered state no longer exists), or invocation of invitation rights by the occupied territory's government.
This may be contrasted with the doctrine of debellatio, or subjugation, that was asserted by the Allies in their occupation of Germany and Japan after World War II.
(115) He also tackles the issue of how the ancient international legal concept of debellatio, the extermination in war of one belligerent by another through annexation of the former's territory after conquest and the annihilation of enemy forces, no longer provides valid title to territory but remains a valid term to describe a "factual phenomenon" of"the total defeat of one party to the conflict that has led to the extinction of most of that State's sovereignty." (116) If followed by occupation or some form of exercise of authority by the victorious State, debellatio will not imply termination of war.