lenition

(redirected from Debuccalization)

le·nite

 (lə-nīt′)
v. le·nit·ed, le·nit·ing, le·nites
v.intr.
To undergo an increase in sonority or become lenis. Said of consonant sounds, as when (p) changes to (b), (b) to (v), or (v) to (w).
v.tr.
To cause (a consonant sound) to lenite.

le·ni′tion (-nĭsh′ən) n.

lenition

(ləˈnɪʃən)
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) the weakening of the articulation of a consonant sound, esp in a Celtic language

le•ni•tion

(lɪˈnɪʃ ən)

n.
a phonological process that weakens consonant articulation at the ends of syllables or between vowels, causing the consonant to become voiced or pronounced as a fricative.
[1910–15; < Latin lēnī(re) (see lenient) + -tion]
Translations
Lenierung
lenición
lénition
lenizione
References in periodicals archive ?
Recall that the lenition of coronals is manifested by debuccalization, interpreted by Ni Chiosain (1991) as the delinking of the coronal node.
Other scholars attempted to explain the -h- as the outcome of a geminated -ss- (which in turn is the expected MI outcome of the OI sequence -sy-) by assuming a series of two sound changes: 1) a degemination -ss- > -s-, and 2) a debuccalization -s- > -h-.
In others, even the secondary articulation is given up, in favour of a phonation type, that is, debuccalization of /[k.
debuccalization, rhotacism of *z > *r, palatalization of velars before front vocalics, etc.