decentralization

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de·cen·tral·ize

 (dē-sĕn′trə-līz′)
v. de·cen·tral·ized, de·cen·tral·iz·ing, de·cen·tral·iz·es
v.tr.
1. To distribute the administrative functions or powers of (a central authority) among several local authorities.
2.
a. To bring about the redistribution of (an urban population and industry) to suburban areas.
b. To cause to withdraw or disperse from a center of concentration: decentralize a university complex; decentralize a museum.
v.intr.
To undergo redistribution or dispersal away from a central location or authority.

de·cen′tral·i·za′tion (-trə-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
de·cen′tral·i·za′tion·ist adj. & n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.decentralization - the social process in which population and industry moves from urban centers to outlying districts
social process - a process involved in the formation of groups of persons
2.decentralization - the spread of power away from the center to local branches or governments
spreading, spread - act of extending over a wider scope or expanse of space or time
centralisation, centralization - the act of consolidating power under a central control
Translations
decentralizáció

decentralization

[diːˌsentrəlaɪˈzeɪʃən] Ndescentralización f

decentralization

[ˌdiːsɛntrəlaɪˈzeɪʃən] decentralisation (British) ndécentralisation f

decentralization

decentralization

[diːˌsɛntrəlaɪˈzeɪʃn] n (Admin, Pol) → decentramento
References in periodicals archive ?
Breitbart M (1978) The Theory & Practice of Anarchist Decentralism in Spain, 1936-1939.
in Australia, the deregulation agenda of the Hawke-Keating Labor governments followed by the election in 1996 of the staunchly neoliberal conservative coalition government, saw the 'managed decentralism' of the early 1980s give way to a more fragmented and decentralised system.
"Even though the speaker continually rhapsodizes about decentralism and 'Third Wave' forms of flexible governance, his environmental vision is little more than top-down technocracy.
Scotland hasn't had a debate about greater decentralism and democracy - preferring post-devolution to put further powers in the hands of Holyrood, who have accumulated more influence and say across a range of public bodies, local government included.
Also calling for a uniform personal status law based on administrative decentralism and gender equity, Gharib concluded that Workers organized in independent syndicates must remain autonomous if they were ever to achieve their full social rights.
With this definition, Otteson alerts us to the fact that the "capitalist" or "market" systems often criticized by well-meaning Christians in fact tend more toward centralism than decentralism and are therefore more socialist-oriented than they might appear.
These accounts, often polemical, tend to polarize into two camps: first, postmodern defenses of the rise of identity politics and radical subjectivitist philosophies as antidotes to the crypto-chauvinisms of the New Left, and, second, more-or-less classically Marxist contentions that the New Left collapsed because of its decentralism and ideological heterogeneity, because, that is, it failed to remain strictly Marxist or socialist.
In his Frazer Lecture of 1947, he was emphatic: British unity originated in diversity and in decentralism - central government had always to take account of local custom and be prepared to compromise.
Firstly, consonant with Oates' (1999) decentralism theorem there seems to be a good case to suggest that boundary reform should focus on creating municipalities with as little heterogeneity as possible.
Amster develops his own framework for analysing anarchism using several sometimes interrelated, sometimes seemingly conflicting, concepts: anti-authoritarianism, voluntarism, mutualism, 'autonomism', egalitarianism, naturalism, anti-capitalism, 'dynamism', pragmatism, utopianism and decentralism. While I had a little trouble getting used to the neologism, 'autonomism' (my brain keeps wanting to read 'automatism', which is pretty much the opposite), Amster clearly explains the concept of autonomy as both individual and social self-governance or self-rule, which for him implies both freedom and responsibility: the freedom to determine one's own actions and values, and the responsibility to do so.