Geneva Convention

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Related to Declaration of Geneva: Hippocratic oath

Geneva Convention

n.
One of a series of agreements first formulated at an international convention held in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1864, establishing rules for the treatment of prisoners of war, the sick, and the wounded.

Geneva Convention

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the international agreement, first formulated in 1864 at Geneva, establishing a code for wartime treatment of the sick or wounded: revised and extended on several occasions to cover maritime warfare and prisoners of war

Gene′va Conven′tion


n.
one of a series of international agreements, first made in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1864, establishing rules for the humane treatment of prisoners of war and of the sick, the wounded, and the dead in battle.
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Noun1.Geneva Convention - an agreement first drawn up in Geneva in 1864 and later revised concerning the treatment of captured and wounded military personnel and civilians in wartime
Translations
Genfer Konvention

Geneva Convention

References in periodicals archive ?
Bahrain's Ministry of Foreign Affairs stressed in a statement the need to intensify the efforts and international endeavors to reach a peaceful, political settlement for the Syrian crisis, based on the principles of the Declaration of Geneva and United Nations Security Council's Resolution 2254 and pursuant to Syria's sovereignty, unity, and territorial integrity, Bahrain News Agency (BNA) reported.
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs stressed in a statement the need to intensify the efforts and international endeavours to reach a peaceful, political settlement for the Syrian crisis, based on the principles of the Declaration of Geneva and United Nations Security Council's Resolution 2254 and pursuant to Syria's sovereignty, unity, and territorial integrity.
The Declaration of Geneva was written in 1948 by the World Medical Association (WMA).
20] The Declaration of Geneva, [21] a statement on the physician's dedication to the medical profession, was among the first acts of the WMA and was endorsed at the 1948 General Assembly.
After the Second World War, and primarily because of human rights abuses by doctors in Nazi Germany, the World Medical Association adopted two modernized forms of the Hippocratic Oath - the Declaration of Geneva in 1948 and the International Code of Medical Ethics in 1949.
The latter are the Hippocratic Oath, the Declaration of Geneva and the Declaration of a New Doctor, as devised by Imperial College School of Medicine graduating year of 2001.
They welcomed the outcome of meetings of Cairo and Moscow and their endeavors to revive the path of political solution of the Syrian crisis, through negotiations, based on the declaration of Geneva I.
It later became the Declaration of Geneva adopted by the League of Nations, and, much later on Nov.
He quoted various Medical Declarations, such as The Declaration of Geneva (1948), which states, "I will maintain the utmost respect for human life from the time of conception, even under threat," and the International Medical Declaration (similar to Lejeune Declaration, 1973), which states, "As medicine remains at the service of life at its end, so it protects life from its beginning".

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