Declaration of Independence

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Declaration of Independence

n
1. (Historical Terms) the proclamation made by the second American Continental Congress on July 4, 1776, which asserted the freedom and independence of the 13 Colonies from Great Britain
2. (Historical Terms) the document formally recording this proclamation

Declaration of Independence

A document asserting that “these united colonies are and of right ought to be free and independent states” 1775–76.
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Noun1.Declaration of Independence - the document recording the proclamation of the second Continental Congress (4 July 1776) asserting the independence of the Colonies from Great Britain
References in classic literature ?
"Freundshaftsbezeigungen" seems to be "Friendship demonstrations," which is only a foolish and clumsy way of saying "demonstrations of friendship." "Unabhaengigkeitserklaerungen" seems to be "Independencedeclarations," which is no improvement upon "Declarations of Independence," so far as I can see.
Furthermore the ICJ declares that in order to respond to the request of the UN General Assembly it needs only to determine whether applicable international law contains prohibitive rules preventing declarations of independence. (14) Besides it differentiates in its observations, between an act of declaration of independence, on the one hand, and the right to secede from a state, on the other, while failing to clarify on which legal basis a declaration of independence does occur.
Q: Do you find the opinion significantly departs from the existing jurisprudence with regard to declarations of independence?
International law has no "prohibition on declarations of independence," ICJ's President Hisashi Owada said.The decision, while nonbinding, opens the way for Kosovo to seek broader international recognition of its statehood, which some 69 countries have already recognized, while Serbia, Russia, China, Greece, Cyprus, Iran and some 100 other countries have not.
The Opinion did not address the issue of sovereignty, territorial integrity or declarations of independence in any further detail; in particular the Court remained silent on whether there exists an entitlement to independence when certain conditions are met.
The senator's desperate attempt to get right with the GOP base is sad to watch for those who found him personally engaging and admired his heroism in Vietnam and his occasional declarations of independence from the Republican Party line.

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