deconstruction

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de·con·struc·tion

 (dē′kən-strŭk′shən)
n.
A philosophical movement and theory of literary criticism that questions traditional assumptions about certainty, identity, and truth; asserts that words can only refer to other words; and attempts to demonstrate how statements about any text subvert their own meanings.

de′con·struc′tive adj.
de′con·struc′tion·ism n.
de′con·struc′tion·ist n. & adj.

deconstruction

(ˌdiːkənˈstrʌkʃən)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a technique of literary analysis that regards meaning as resulting from the differences between words rather than their reference to the things they stand for. Different meanings are discovered by taking apart the structure of the language used and exposing the assumption that words have a fixed reference point beyond themselves
ˌdeconˈstructionist n, adj

de•con•struc•tion

(ˌdi kənˈstrʌk ʃən)

n.
1. a theory of textual analysis positing that a text has no stable reference and questioning assumptions about the ability of language to represent reality.
2. a philosophical and critical movement that started in France in the 1960s, holding this theory.
[1970–75; < French]
de`con•struc′tion•ist, n., adj.

deconstruction

Critical interpretation of a text by studying linguistic signs in isolation from other elements such as knowledge of its author and cultural background.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deconstruction - a philosophical theory of criticism (usually of literature or film) that seeks to expose deep-seated contradictions in a work by delving below its surface meaning
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
literature - creative writing of recognized artistic value
Translations

deconstruction

[ˌdiːkənˈstrʌkʃən] Ndeconstrucción f

deconstruction

[ˌdiːkənˈstrʌkʃən] n [text, idea] → déconstruction f
References in periodicals archive ?
Alluding to the infamous case of Paul de Man, whose deconstructionist theories have been reinterpreted in the light of the revelation of his disgraceful wartime past, Banville's novel presents a man who veers between the temptation to fall back on his theories in order to uphold a lifelong deception, and the impulse to reveal the truth and achieve belated absolution.
This 'post-liberationist' era requires us to revisit the relevance and usefulness of relying too heavily on deconstructionist theories and further, to dare to ask the question as to whether or not these theories of homosexuality that seek to champion the individual, in practice, specifically psychotherapeutic practice, end up paradoxically marginalising and alienating the individual in a pious and ironic attempt to fit them into an alternative cultural edifice.
Ann Fienup-Riordan is so honest that when she writes, despite her intentions to work along the prevailing structuralist or deconstructionist theories in anthropology, or the political expediencies of our time, at least three times she found herself breaking with these and showing instead the intricacies and beauties of the Yup'ik people's culture.