deconstructivism

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de·con·struc·tiv·ism

 (dē′kən-strŭk′tə-vĭz′əm)
n.
An architectural style developed in the 1980s, characterized by unconventional, often arresting design elements, such as curved or sloping walls, slanted columns, and asymmetric structures and spaces.

de′con·struc′tiv·ist n. & adj.
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Noun1.deconstructivism - a school of architecture based on the philosophical theory of deconstruction
school - a body of creative artists or writers or thinkers linked by a similar style or by similar teachers; "the Venetian school of painting"
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7) In the first strand, with antecedents that go back to the modern Masters of suspicion (Machiavelli, Marx, Freud, and Nietzsche), we find authors like Weber, Elias, Adorno, Althusser, Foucault, and Bourdieu in the materialist, structuralist, deconstructivist, and critical tradition who consider ethics an epiphenomenon--and sometimes even a mask--of deeper lying interests and power struggles.
After that experience, he said,"I ultimately realised that my heart and soul were really more with tradition than deconstructivist modernism.
Applying deconstructivist architectural styles and modern swimming pool features, the collection embodies a refreshing summery feeling.
If we are to imagine a "critical area studies" in geography that aims to join critical theory and the area studies tradition, this will require moving beyond the simple deconstructivist impulse to point out that regions are socially constructed to ask how regions are constructed.
In the following, I will draw from some arguments provided by decolonial and deconstructivist scholars such as Boaventura de Sousa Santos (2007, 2012, 2014), Judith Butler (2010) and Gayatri Spivak (1994) in order to elaborate on the linkages between epistemic injustice, the denial of agency and aspirations (as pointed out by the Centre for Political Beauty), and denial of recognition of lives as grievable (as lamented by #JesuisNigeria).
Visitors will also see more than 500 works by Latin American masters inside a deconstructivist building with a sharply angled limestone-and-glass exterior in Palermo Chico.
To him, in the gap that allows thinking of that which links and inevitably separates rationalist philosophical perspectives and more deconstructivist philosophical perspectives about speech is where one can constitute the dispersion space of Foucauldian enunciations.
The suggested deconstructivist roadmap will lead to the conclusion that the mythical (yet powerful) geopolitical divide that still characterises law's ontological, anthropological, and biopolitical signification in Civil and Common law (12) traditions notwithstanding the dissolutive dictum of the global order project, make the attempt to encapsulate Australian contract law within a constructivist 'corpus' juris in Hayekian terms inappropriate and dangerous.
Like much of the other tropes above, the Islamist view of Indonesian history engaged within the critical discussion of history, especially the deconstructivist approach that grew from the postmodern turn in the 1980s.
The ballet was in the deconstructivist tradition of William Forsythe, yet unlike anything else being created.
Thus McHale proposes two sub-models derived from postmodern architecture: the semiotic or historicist model (referring to approaching architecture as language or code) and the deconstructivist model (referring to the building-as-text approach to architecture).
Owing to this coincidence, Bloom came to often be associated --around the end of the 1970s and 1980s--with the deconstructivist and poststructuralist critics from Yale (see Bloom, de Man, Derrida, Hartman, Miller 1979), who were reevaluating the humanities from the perspective of deconstruction.