Decretum


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Decretum

(dɪˈkriːtəm)
n
(Roman Catholic Church) RC Church the name given to various collections of canon law, esp that made by the monk Gratian in the 12th century, which forms the first part of the Corpus Juris Canonici
References in periodicals archive ?
Here he has recourse to the Decretum which states that certain things, such as clerical violence, which had been lawful in the Old Testament, are now prohibited.
The Making of Gratian's Decretum. [Volume IL, Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought.] By Anders Winroth.
(86) Cyprian, Epistles, 128.9; Gratian, Decretum, 8.9.
The passage chosen by Covarrubias's examiners for the doctoral conclusiones came from Gratian's Decretum, one of the two major texts studied in the canon law curriculum.
Some of the texts have been translated specifically for this anthology, including extracts from Tertullian, De Cultu Feminarum; Ambrose; Gratian's Decretum (not usually thought of as anti-feminist but shown to be vital to the tradition); The Life of Secundus; Marbod of Rennes; Jacques de Vitry; The Lamentations of Matheolus (known by repute to readers of Christine de Pizan); Albertano of Brescia (similarly known to readers of Chaucer).
First there is the decretum that Caesar drew up in his lifetime, cancelling the planned settlements in Buthrotum in exchange for payment of the region's war indemnity by Cicero's friend Atticus.(24) This decree had not yet been published at the time of Caesar's death, and many of the letters to Atticus discuss the efforts made to secure its recognition, including its adjudication by the consuls in June.
Dr Linda Fowler-Magerl, the honorand of this volume, has reinvigorated the study of pre-Gratian medieval canon law in a manner similar to Anders Winroth's path-breaking findings on the authorship of the Decretum of 'Gratian'.
demanded the adoption of principles of procedure and the like for the equitable application of the canons of the Decretum in everyday cases" (52-53).
turned to Gratian's Decretum in the West and to Balsamon's commentary on the Nomokanon in the East: each was prominent and influential for centuries to come, and each consolidated its own tradition--and the tragic schism of the churches.
Sichard cannot understand why the document cited in the Decree of Gratian (in fact a recension of the Decretum Gelasianum) declares as apocryphal Clement's "eight books divided into fifty chapters." He finds the whole thing deeply suspicious.(65) He himself has found no manuscripts (of the Rufinus version of the Recognitiones) containing either chapter divisions or anything other than ten books.
Incidentis in incid.: Querelae nullitatis adversus decretum rotale diei 21 octobris 2009
In the spirit of Anthony Grafton's Forgers and Critics (Princeton, 1990), Macy explores the impact that spurious works had on late medieval, Early Modern and even modern thought through Gratian's Decretum, a corpus of canon law compiled in the twelfth century.