bedsore

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Related to Decubitis: decubitus

bed·sore

 (bĕd′sôr′)
n.
A pressure-induced ulceration of the skin occurring in persons confined to bed for long periods of time. Also called decubitus ulcer.

bedsore

(ˈbɛdˌsɔː)
n
(Pathology) the nontechnical name for decubitus ulcer

bed•sore

(ˈbɛdˌsɔr, -ˌsoʊr)

n.
a skin ulcer over a bony part of the body, caused by immobility and prolonged pressure, as in bedridden persons; decubitus ulcer. Also called pressure sore.
[1860–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bedsore - a chronic ulcer of the skin caused by prolonged pressure on it (as in bedridden patients)
ulcer, ulceration - a circumscribed inflammatory and often suppurating lesion on the skin or an internal mucous surface resulting in necrosis of tissue
Translations

bedsore

[ˈbedsɔːʳ] Núlcera f de decúbito

bedsore

bed sore [ˈbɛdsɔːr] nescarre f

bedsore

[ˈbɛdˌsɔːʳ] npiaga da decubito

bed·sore

, bed sore
n. úlcera por decúbito.

bedsore

n úlcera de decúbito (form),úlcera por presión, llaga debida a permanecer mucho tiempo sentado o encamado sin cambiar de posición
References in periodicals archive ?
This includes lower leg cellulitis and decubitis ulcers, (27) and skin malignancies including squamous cell cancer and mycosis fungoides.
Other rare findings included stasis ulcers, stasis dermatitis, psoriasis, lichen planus, hidradenitis suppurativa, keloids, adiposis dolorosa, livedo reticularis and decubitis ulcer.
Complications, such as deep vein thrombosis, autonomic dysfunction, respiratory failure, immobilization hypocalcaemia, and decubitis, can develop particularly in acute stages of GBS (31, 32).
Prostate biopsies were performed with patients in the left decubitis position using the SonoScape SSI-2000 BW system (SonoScape, Co.
The patients were evaluated after 5 minutes of rest and in the left lateral decubitis position.
As a result of her efforts, the hospital's decubitis ulcer rate has decreased.
6) There is evidence, for example, that when patient mobilisation is rationed, there is a direct link with decubitis ulcers, pneumonia and toss of general condition.