Defectuous

De`fec´tu`ous


a.1.Full of defects; imperfect.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, he praises Thomas Sackville and Thomas Norton's Inns of Court play, Gorboduc (first performed in 1561; printed in 1565), in Horatian terms as 'full of notable morality, which it doth most delightfully teach', then criticises it as 'very defectuous in the circumstances'; in its failure to observe the Aristotelian unities, it is 'faulty both in place and time' and so 'might not remain as an exact model of all tragedies'.
Stenothermic, prefers temperatures around 25[degrees]C; at 20[degrees]C or lower, ephippial females and males occur, and postabdomen deformities result from defectuous moulting.
New perspectives in cell therapy (Hornyak, 2008) showing that it is possible to reprogramming normal adult human cells into the perfect equivalent of pluripotent stem cells (i.e., cells which like embryonic cells can develop into any type of tis sue), thus bypassing the need to use human embryonic cells, also offers hope to allow replacing some defectuous human tissue with normal ones while avoiding the threat of immune rejection if cells derived from an embryo are transplanted into a person.