deforestation

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de·for·est

 (dē-fôr′ĭst, -fŏr′-)
tr.v. de·for·est·ed, de·for·est·ing, de·for·ests
1. To cut down and clear away the trees or forests from.
2. To destroy the trees or forests on: hillsides that were deforested by drought.

de·for′es·ta′tion (-ĭ-stā′shən) n.
de·for′est·er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

de·for·es·ta·tion

(dē-fôr′ĭ-stā′shən)
The cutting down and removal of all or most of the trees in a forested area. Deforestation can damage the environment by causing erosion of soils, and it decreases biodiversity by destroying the habitats needed for different organisms.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deforestation - the state of being clear of treesdeforestation - the state of being clear of trees  
environmental condition - the state of the environment
2.deforestation - the removal of trees
baring, denudation, husking, stripping, uncovering - the removal of covering
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ontbossing

deforestation

[diːˌfɒrəˈsteɪʃən] Ndeforestación f, despoblación f forestal
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

deforestation

[diːˌfɒrɪˈsteɪʃən] ndéforestation f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

deforestation

nEntwaldung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

deforestation

[diːˌfɒrɪsˈteɪʃən] ndeforestazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Experts have often related the fall and decline of past civilisations to environmental degradation resulting from deforestation. If that is the opinion of the experts, then Pakistan should fear for its survival.
In Africa and tropical Asia, commercial agriculture and subsistence agriculture both account for one third of deforestation. REDD+ seeks to prevent deforestation while solving the challenges of sustainable agriculture production and impacts of forest degradation.
"There is not the slightest doubt," he told Reuters when asked whether the data pointed to a trend of significantly increasing deforestation. "Our data is absolutely correct."
Environmentalists have warned that Bolsonaro's strong remarks calling for the development of the Amazon and criticising the country's environmental enforcement agency Ibama for handing out too many fines would embolden loggers and ranchers seeking to profit from deforestation.
These firms are now trying out new satellite technology to track deforestation. They say the monitoring systems allow them to target people felling trees in producing countries-where forests are shrinking-more efficiently than policing supply chains on the ground.
That will show those who accuse me of deforestation. [I will ask] where you got this wood from?' he said.
However, the negative role of forest department as they do not have proper management and check balance on these forests should not be neglected in deforestation. In the current study the geological impacts like landslides and soil erosion has also been discussed as 78% of the local residents were also aware of the fact that with degradation of forest this hazard increases.
More and more free land is needed for civics and for filling our needs we undoubtedly go for deforestation. Deforestation at mass scale is a very irresponsible act and later it results in shortage of rain and biblical droughts.
While the rate does mark a significant rise from last year, when the rate of deforestation dropped 16% in a 12 month period, it still marks a 72% drop from 2004, when the Brazilian federal government launched measures to combat deforestation.
This summer, PwC supported the Tropical Forest Alliance 2020 - a platform for public-private collaboration to address forest loss - to set out the business case and framework for financial institutions to act on their exposures to deforestation.
The transmission of green house gases mainly carbon in the environment is rapidly increasing because of the alarming extent of deforestation.