deus ex machina

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de·us ex ma·chi·na

(dā′əs ĕks mä′kə-nə, -nä′, măk′ə-nə)
n.
1. In Greek and Roman drama, a god lowered by stage machinery to resolve a plot or extricate the protagonist from a difficult situation.
2. An unexpected, artificial, or improbable character, device, or event introduced suddenly in a work of fiction or drama to resolve a situation or untangle a plot.
3. A person or event that provides a sudden and unexpected solution to a difficulty.

[New Latin deus ex māchinā : Latin deus, god; see dyeu- in Indo-European roots + Latin ex, from; see eghs in Indo-European roots + Latin māchinā, ablative of māchina, machine; see machine. Translation of Greek theos apo mēkhanēs).]

deus ex machina

(ˈdeɪʊs ɛks ˈmækɪnə)
n
1. (Theatre) (in ancient Greek and Roman drama) a god introduced into a play to resolve the plot
2. (Theatre) any unlikely or artificial device serving this purpose
[literally: god out of a machine, translating Greek theos ek mēkhanēs]

de•us ex ma•chi•na

(ˈdeɪ əs ɛks ˈmɑ kə nə, ˈdi əs ɛks ˈmæk ə nə)
n.
1. (in classical drama) a god introduced into a play to resolve the entanglements of the plot.
2. any artificial or improbable device resolving the difficulties of a plot.
[1690–1700; < New Latin, literally, god from a machine (i.e., stage machinery from which a deity's statue was lowered)]

deus ex machina

the device of resolving dramatic action by the introduction of an unexpected, improbable, or forced character or incident.
See also: Drama

deus ex machina

A Latin phrase meaning god out of a machine, used to mean a contrived, unlikely solution to a problem.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deus ex machina - any active agent who appears unexpectedly to solve an insoluble difficulty
causal agency, causal agent, cause - any entity that produces an effect or is responsible for events or results
Translations
deus ex machina

deus ex machina

References in periodicals archive ?
Instead of seeking non-existent alternative choices and dei ex machina, maybe we must decide to take control and our fate in our own hands," Georgiades said during a joint meeting of the House Finance and Foreign Affairs Committees.