Deianira


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Deianira

(ˌdiːəˈnaɪərə; ˌdeɪə-)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a sister of Meleager and wife of Hercules. She unintentionally killed Hercules by dipping his tunic in the poisonous blood of the Centaur Nessus, thinking it to be a love charm
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
McCrary has a husband, Thomas, and two daughters, Deianira, 9, and Briseia, 6.
He first went to Calydon and married Deianira, the king's daughter.
At about 38 years of age Heracles and his wife, Deianira were travelling and came to the fast-flowing Euenus river.
tragiche (Deianira, Giocasta) nella tipica scena della stanza da letto,
Deianira, nelle Trachinie di Sofocle, afferma che Eracle e suo sposo appena di nome, ma di fatto egli appartiene a Iole, piu giovane di lei (v.47-551, apud Palumbo, 2012, p.157 n.35).
1626) and Sebastiano Ricci's Nessus Abducts Deianira (c.
Pamphile is certainly different from her tragic antecedents, such as Medea, who did not submit passively to such ill treatment on the part of Jason; even Deianira, who refrained from an open expression of anger when her husband Heracles installed a captive princess in their home in Sophocles's play, Women of Trachis, sought remedy in a love potion, which ended up killing the brute.
In Greek myth, Deianira was whose third wife, tricked into giving him a shirt that proved fatal?
Using as a research source Pierre Grimal's Dictionary of Greek and Roman mythology, we have found a number of 95 characters, of which we mention Antigone, Deianira, Heracles, Narcissus, Hylonome the Centaur, Niobe, Sappho, Jocasta, Melicertes (Palemon), Dido, Euphrates, Euridyce, Ajax, Ino (Leucothea), Cyone, Anticlea, Calydon, Melos, Phaedra, Thisbe, Parthenope, Althaea, Amata, Aura, Byblis--to mention just some of the names which are rather more popular resorted to the supreme gesture of ending their life in a free and consenting manner, either by hanging (most cases), or by tossing themselves into a void, a river or into the sea, by fire or sword.
Mabuse was one of the painters most capable of representing the sense of touch, as may be seen from his panel of Hercules and Deianira (1517) at the Barber Institute in Birmingham, which is a special example of how he rendered tactile qualities in paint.
An example of actual penetration-by-clothing is Hercules' death from the peplos given to him by Deianira (cf.