deixis

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deix·is

 (dīk′sĭs)
n.
The function of a deictic word in specifying its referent in a given context.

[Greek, display, demonstrative reference, from deiknunai, to show; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

deixis

(ˈdaɪksɪs)
n
(Grammar) grammar the use or reference of a deictic word
[C20: from Greek, from deiknunai to show]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deixis - the function of pointing or specifying from the perspective of a participant in an act of speech or writing; aspects of a communication whose interpretation depends on knowledge of the context in which the communication occurs
semantics - the study of language meaning
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
déixis

deixis

[ˈdaɪksɪs] Ndeixis f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

deixis

n (Ling) → Deixis f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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References in periodicals archive ?
In sentence 1), the use of the near temporal deictic expression "now" ("aknun") accompanied with the back shifted tenses are signs of FID.
The reference origin of a deictic expression is the situational context, whereas an anaphor obtains its reference from co-text.
In contrast, by using the deictic expression there in line (e), Lucille can prompt her interlocutors to draw on information available in the present interactional context-specifically, information about the placement of the bedroom windows-to build a model of the overall spatial configuration of the storyworld.
Both are combined in a single sentence in: "My first vivid impression seems to me to have been gained." The "seems" warns us that adult Pip' s testimony is based on somewhat hazy memories, and the deictic expression "At such a time" (line 4) allows for more latitude and inaccuracy than "then" or "at that time." Some degree of temporal vagueness is natural enough for someone recalling a distant childhood.
Computers products such as Siri, Alexa, and Echo can handle short exchanges on generic topics but not lengthier coherent conversations, nonliteral language, humor, deictic expressions (here, there, this, that) and other dimensions of discourse that are contextually specific--and that will always have high demand in the workforce.
Aspects of Spanish deictic expressions in Barcelona: A quantitative examination.
For deictic expressions, TID uses the pointing signs HERE and THERE and the signing space, the space surrounding the signer's body.
As far as the stylistic means of achieving the emphasis on the self are concerned, the artful use of deictic expressions represents a fundamental stylistic device used by the confessional poets.
In this essay I show how marked patterns in the use of deictic expressions in literary texts (e.g., "I" "you," "this," "that") can contribute to the projection of fictional minds that appear to work in "nonstandard" or "unorthodox" ways (see Leech and Short; Margolin).
In the final panel, USEK's Talal Wehbe will present a paper, in French, whose title might well be translated as "Proximal and distal deictic expressions in Gibran's 'Madman:' the cultural roots." USEK's Rosie Ghannage will present a paper whose title could be translated as "A corpus stylistic approach to Gibran's concept of 'Love.'" Najwa Mounayer, who works at the Bahrain Embassy in France, promises a paper called "The translation of the poetic image in Gibran's 'Prophet,' and the way back to origins." The Goethe Institute's Ursula Assaf will discuss "Gibran K.