deiform

deiform

(ˈdiːɪˌfɔːm)
adj
(Art Terms) having the form or appearance of a god; sacred or divine
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Hankey, "Self and Cosmos in Becoming Deiform: Neoplatonic Paradigms for Reform by Self-knowledge from Augustine to Aquinas," in Reforming the Church before Modernity: Patterns, Problems, and Approaches, ed.
(90) Therefore, it is not exaggerated to describe the intellect of pure spirits as deiform. (91) Finally, it is necessary to make clear that angels and demons in Thomistic theology not only approach God because of the perfection of their minds (92) but also on account of the peculiar process of individuation that is their distinctive trait as separate substances.
The man in the open society is the true boniform of law, tradition, prudence, ethos, and virtue--man in the end as deiform. (12)
Beyond the dispassionate God of classical metaphysical theology, beyond the deiform Ego of modernity, the God takes flesh in what St.
Yet since Christ came through a chaste mother, virginal, unbound, deiform, immaculate (since of necessity he was born without marriage or father), he sanctified the feminine, and Eve shook off bitterness and dismissed the law of flesh, and to the great words of the Spirit the letter yielded, and grace came into the midst; at that moment virginity shone and illumined humans, released from the world, and releasing the powerless world, as greatly pre-eminent over married and bound life as the soul is superior to the flesh; as the region below is to the broad heaven, so is the fleeting life to stable blessedness; thus God surpasses man.