deindividuation


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deindividuation

(diːˌɪndɪvɪdjʊˈeɪʃən)
n
(Psychology) psychol the loss of a person's sense of individuality and personal responsibility
References in periodicals archive ?
Fan states: "What many of Jia's characters negotiate with themselves is the intricate relationship between individuation and deindividuation, subjectivization and desubjectivization.
These aspects can also be linked with the second explanation, what psychologist Philip Zimbardo calls "deindividuation", or the power of anonymity.
Our focal interest lies with how the social identification and deindividuation effect (SIDE), a socio-psychological phenomenon that is evident in Computer Mediated Communication (Spears 2017), can produce either social capital bridging or polarized stances.
An integration of online disinhibition and deindividuation effects with the social structure and social learning model.
Self-awareness, deindividuation, and social identity: Unraveling theoretical paradoxes by filling empirical lacunae.
Arendt's focus on the prevention of dehumanisation further serves as a means to discuss materialism's risk in negotiating the tension between deindividuation and dehumanisation.
Deindividuation means that the agent considers himself a part of the crowd and no longer a separate individual: the higher the agent's arousal and the cohesion of his group, the higher the deindividuation.
For example, this review has not considered other social and environmental factors linked to aggression that are also important, such as heat, crowding, noise, pollution, cultural norms, exposure to violent media, social structures, and group dynamics such as mob behavior, which involves many interesting theories like contagion theory, convergence theory, emergent-norm theory, deindividuation theory, and sociocultural theories, among others (see Baron & Byrne, 1977; Felson & Tedeschi, 1993; Flannery, Vazsonyi, & Waldman, 2007; Geen & Donnerstein, 1983; Goldstein, 1994; Huesmann, 1994; Shaver & Mikulincer, 2011).
With respect to the impact of team size, a large body of social psychological research shows larger group size promotes deindividuation (i.e., loss of individuality, self-evaluation apprehension and self-awareness) and diffusion of responsibility (i.e., reduction of moral self-sanctioning as blame is diffused across the group; Bandura, 1986), both of which are associated with perpetration of wrongdoing and aggressive acts (Bandura, 1986; Diener, 1980; Kugihara, 2001; Zimbardo, 2004).
Some post-1950 theories (as organized by Jesus, 2013) reach similar conclusions: theory of deindividuation (e.g.
Reagle differentiates depersonalization to that of deindividuation, in which users lose a sense of themselves.