deindividuation


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deindividuation

(diːˌɪndɪvɪdjʊˈeɪʃən)
n
(Psychology) psychol the loss of a person's sense of individuality and personal responsibility
References in periodicals archive ?
An integration of online disinhibition and deindividuation effects with the social structure and social learning model.
Self-awareness, deindividuation, and social identity: Unraveling theoretical paradoxes by filling empirical lacunae.
Arendt's focus on the prevention of dehumanisation further serves as a means to discuss materialism's risk in negotiating the tension between deindividuation and dehumanisation.
With respect to the impact of team size, a large body of social psychological research shows larger group size promotes deindividuation (i.
Reagle differentiates depersonalization to that of deindividuation, in which users lose a sense of themselves.
y Kelem, Roger T "Effects of deindividuation variables on stealing among Halloween trick-or-treaters".
These people who lose their normal restraints and inhibitions and say things they could never imagine themselves saying when they're alone, are said to have experienced deindividuation or a loss of self-awareness.
Social psychologists who analyze the behavior and mindset involved in gang rape posit that the diffusion of responsibility, deindividuation, and modeling of aggression are what spurs individuals into such aggressive behavior.
According to optimal distinctiveness theory, developed by Brewer (1991), social identity ought to satisfy members' needs to belong to the organization as well as their needs to differentiate from the other groups', "social identity can be viewed as a compromise between assimilation and differentiation from others, where the need for deindividuation is satisfied within in-groups while the need for distinctiveness is met through intergroup comparisons": 477.
One could even argue that this SNS in particular promotes the concept of deindividuation which allows people who use it to reinvent themselves and experiment with different types of self-conception.
Deindividuation is a reference to the term individuation, which was coined by Carl Jung as differentiating oneself through the process developing an individual personality (Jung, Adler, & Hull, 1971).
Like domestic rioters, groups of soldiers can be affected by arousal and deindividuation, which can lead to massacres, group rape, or wanton destruction of property.