deism

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de·ism

 (dē′ĭz′əm, dā′-)
n.
A religious belief holding that God created the universe and established rationally comprehensible moral and natural laws but does not intervene in human affairs through miracles or supernatural revelation.

[French déisme, from Latin deus, god; see dyeu- in Indo-European roots.]

de′ist n.
de·is′tic adj.
de·is′ti·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

deism

(ˈdiːɪzəm; ˈdeɪ-)
n
(Theology) belief in the existence of God based solely on natural reason, without reference to revelation. Compare theism
[C17: from French déisme, from Latin deus god]
ˈdeist n, adj
deˈistic, deˈistical adj
deˈistically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•ism

(ˈdi ɪz əm)

n.
belief in the existence of a God on the evidence of reason and nature, with rejection of supernatural revelation.
[1675–85; < French déisme < Latin de(us) god + French -isme -ism]
de′ist, n.
de•is′tic, de•is′ti•cal, adj.
de•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

deism

the acknowledgment of the existence of a god upon the testimony of reason and of nature and its laws, and the rejection of the possibility of supernatural intervention in human affairs and of special revelation. — deist, n.deistic, adj.
See also: God and Gods
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deism - the form of theological rationalism that believes in God on the basis of reason without reference to revelation
rationalism - the theological doctrine that human reason rather than divine revelation establishes religious truth
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
deismus
deisme
deism
deismi
דאיזם
deizam
deisme
deizm
deism
deism
自然神論

deism

[ˈdiːɪzəm] Ndeísmo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

deism

[ˈdiːɪzəm ˈdeɪɪzəm] ndéisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

deism

nDeismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Accompanied by the Iloi (Queens of the Royal household), a large throng of Chiefs, Enigie, Priest of different divinity and deistical leanings, market women, members of the Royal family and a mammoth crowd to the Emotan Shrine, the Benin monarch meticulously performed a number of sacred rites, with the active involvement of all the customary functionaries and groups.
(26.) Note that Mandeville's name is absent in the better-known A View of the Principal Deistical Writers (London, B.
In the Vocabulary to which his Western Australia Report was originally attached, Grey was scathing about 'deistical writers' who dreamed that 'savage man', 'urged on by his necessities, and aided by his senses', might 'step by step' climb to the 'pinnacle of civilisation' without some outside governmental intervention to change the basis of their social interaction, their laws and their customs (Quoted Stocking, 1987: 83).
Stewart begins his book by introducing two unlikely figures, Vermont's Revolutionary military hero, Ethan Allen, and Thomas Young, a peripatetic physician and anti-British agitator, both of whom, Stewart tells us, contemporaries called "infidels" and "atheists" but also "more accurately, but mostly to the same effect--'deists.'" Stewart weaves mini-biographies of Allen and Young through the book, which in Allen's case tediously revisits the problem of how Allen, an uneducated man, could have written the book Reason: the Only Oracle of Man, explicating the fine points of radical deistical philosophy; Stewart presents Young as a principled deist/ atheist, but the proof of this proposition frequently rests on conclusions deduced from anonymous publications.