Delian


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Delian

(ˈdiːlɪən)
n
(Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Delos
adj
1. (Placename) of or relating to Delos
2. (Classical Music) of or relating to Delius
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References in classic literature ?
Thucydides quotes the Delian "Hymn to Apollo", and it is possible that the Homeric corpus of his day also contained other of the more important hymns.
The "Hymn to Apollo" consists of two parts, which beyond any doubt were originally distinct, a Delian hymn and a Pythian hymn.
The Delian hymn describes how Leto, in travail with Apollo, sought out a place in which to bear her son, and how Apollo, born in Delos, at once claimed for himself the lyre, the bow, and prophecy.
The Delian part is exclusively Ionian and insular both in style and sympathy; Delos and no other is Apollo's chosen seat: but the second part is as definitely continental; Delos is ignored and Delphi alone is the important centre of Apollo's worship.
However, with the Delian League slowly morphing into the Athenian empire, the Athenians found themselves able to draw on vast resources.
The army is led by the statesman Pericles and has come to take away the treasury of the Delian League, the defense fund of the Greeks against the Persian Empire.
Neville de Mestre focuses on the Delian Problem, and investigates using two modes, logic and geometry, to solve this particular problem.
Tribute exacted from the 200 member states of the Delian League funded Pericles' ship-building program and built the Parthenon.
The Delian guide booklet was officially launched on the 7th (available free from the Tourist office at The Herbert and at the Music Museum) and finally on Monday, 'Derbyshire Way' was officially named.
Particularly enlightening is Rahe's focus on the Spartan's subjugation and enslaving of the neighboring Messenians and the formation of the "Spartan Alliance," later expanded to the Peloponnesian League that would face down Persia and the Delian League alike (106-20).
Eighteen years later came the glorious victory over the Persians, and shortly thereafter the Greeks formed the Delian League, pledging their alliance against the Persians.
The answers fall in place if we read Aristotle as responding to the Delian challenge that the finest, best, and most pleasant are not united in one and the same thing (Nicomachean Ethics 1.