tocopherol

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to·coph·er·ol

 (tō-kŏf′ə-rôl′, -rōl′)
n.
Any of a group of closely related fat-soluble alcohols that are forms of vitamin E and that differ from the tocotrienols in having saturated side chains.

[Greek tokos, offspring, childbirth; see tek- in Indo-European roots + Greek pherein, to bear, carry; see bher- in Indo-European roots + -ol (tocopherols being so called because they were discovered after it was observed that rats did not reproduce when fed a diet lacking these compounds).]

tocopherol

(tɒˈkɒfəˌrɒl)
n
(Biochemistry) biochem any of a group of fat-soluble alcohols that occur in wheat-germ oil, watercress, lettuce, egg yolk, etc. They are thought to be necessary for healthy human reproduction. Also called: vitamin E
[C20: from toco-, from Greek tokos offspring (see tocology) + -pher-, from pherein to bear + -ol1]

to•coph•er•ol

(toʊˈkɒf əˌrɔl, -ˌrɒl)

n.
any of several oils that constitute vitamin E.
[1936; < Greek tóko(s) child, childbirth + phér(ein) to carry, bear1 + -ol1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tocopherol - a fat-soluble vitamin that is essential for normal reproductiontocopherol - a fat-soluble vitamin that is essential for normal reproduction; an important antioxidant that neutralizes free radicals in the body
alpha-tocopheral - a potent form of vitamin E obtained from germ oils or by synthesis
antioxidant - substance that inhibits oxidation or inhibits reactions promoted by oxygen or peroxides
fat-soluble vitamin - any vitamin that is soluble in fats
Translations

tocopherol

n tocoferol m
References in periodicals archive ?
"Vitamin E" refers to a group of eight naturally occurring compounds with antioxidant activity: alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta-tocopherol and alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta-tocotrienol.
Adzuki beans a darker seed coat had a 4% higher total tocopherol concentration than light colored seeds, seed color also impact delta-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol concentrations.
Other tocopherols, like gamma-and delta-tocopherol, are almost quantitatively degraded and excreted in the urine as the corresponding CEHCs.
Preliminary research, largely in animals, suggests that natural vitamin E rich in gamma-tocopherol and, depending on the oil source, delta-tocopherol, may be more cancer preventive than alpha-tocopherol alone, which is the only form in synthetic vitamin E.
In researching colon cancer, Yang pointed to another recently published paper that the delta-tocopherol form of vitamin E was more effective than other forms of vitamin E in suppressing the development of colon cancer in rats.
Alpha-tocopherol and delta-tocopherol (d-tocopherol) are the most commonly known ones.
Although a majority of these studies were poorly designed and misinterpreted, the greater drawback is that consumers were largely left unaware of the remaining three tocopherols (beta-, gamma- and delta-tocopherol) and the tocotrienol subfamily of vitamin E (alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-tocotrienol).