restless legs syndrome

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Related to Delusional parasitosis: Morgellons

restless legs syndrome

n.
A neurological disorder characterized by an uncontrollable urge to move the legs, usually as a result of uncomfortable sensations such as tingling or aching. It is usually worse in the evening and night and during periods of inactivity, and it often interferes with sleep. Also called Willis-Ekbom disease.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.restless legs syndrome - feeling of uneasiness and restlessness in the legs after going to bed (sometimes causing insomnia); may be relieved temporarily by walking or moving the legs
syndrome - a pattern of symptoms indicative of some disease
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References in periodicals archive ?
They identified 22 female and 13 male county residents with a firm diagnosis of delusional infestation, also known as delusional parasitosis. This disorder is marked by a patient's fixed false belief that they are infested with insects, worms, or other pathogens.
Delusional parasitosis is a rare disorder that is defined by an individual having a fixed, false belief that he or she is being infected or grossly invaded by a living organism.
Further, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states, "the signs and symptoms of Morgellons are very similar to those of a mental illness involving false beliefs about infestation by parasites (delusional parasitosis)." There are about 50,000 sufferers of the illness registered at the CDC, as per the 2006-2015 statistics by (http://www.morgellons-research.org/morgellons/morgellons-statistic.htm) Morgellonsreseach.com.
In delusional parasitosis, patients have the false belief that their bodies are infested by organisms and such patients often present with bits of excoriated skin, insect parts, or debris to support their argument (1).
Psychiatric diseases have a lot of cutaneous expression, like in neurodermatoses such as lichen simplex chronicus, prurigo nodularis, dermatitis artefacta, delusional parasitosis and psychogenic pruritus.
Delusional parasitosis affects both sexes equally below the age of 507 and is associated with schizophrenia,10 paranoid states, bipolar disorders, depression, anxiety disorders and obsessional states.2 In our study, delusional parasitosis was seen in female schizophrenic patients and this is comparable to the study conducted by Kuruvila et al.9 in India.
Ekbom syndrome, popularly known as delusional parasitosis (1) has been fully clinically described by the Swedish neurologist Karl A.
One example of a shared delusion is delusional parasitosis. This is a rare delusional disorder where the patient is convinced of being infested with worms, insects, parasites, or bacteria while no objective evidence exists to support this belief.
Define delusional parasitosis (DP), its pathophysiology, presentation, diagnosis, and epidemiology.
When allergogoly meets psychiatry: a delusional parasitosis (Ekbom's syndrome).
When other causes of infectious dysesthesias --such as scabies, cercarial dermatitis, and cutaneous larva migrans--are excluded by physical examination or skin biopsy, and no treatable dermatoses are diagnosed, this condition is called delusional infestation, formerly delusional parasitosis. The objectives of this review are to present a representative series of cases of delusional infestations and to recommend effective management strategies.
Primary delusional parasitosis treated with olanzapine.