restless legs syndrome

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Related to Delusional parasitosis: Morgellons

restless legs syndrome

n.
A neurological disorder characterized by an uncontrollable urge to move the legs, usually as a result of uncomfortable sensations such as tingling or aching. It is usually worse in the evening and night and during periods of inactivity, and it often interferes with sleep. Also called Willis-Ekbom disease.
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Noun1.restless legs syndrome - feeling of uneasiness and restlessness in the legs after going to bed (sometimes causing insomnia); may be relieved temporarily by walking or moving the legs
syndrome - a pattern of symptoms indicative of some disease
References in periodicals archive ?
An audience poll showed that respondents were divided as to whether patients presenting with delusional infestation, also known as delusional parasitosis, should be confronted, referred to a psychiatrist, treated with an antipsychotic, or approached in some other way.
Psychiatric diseases have a lot of cutaneous expression, like in neurodermatoses such as lichen simplex chronicus, prurigo nodularis, dermatitis artefacta, delusional parasitosis and psychogenic pruritus.
Delusional parasitosis affects both sexes equally below the age of 507 and is associated with schizophrenia,10 paranoid states, bipolar disorders, depression, anxiety disorders and obsessional states.
Ekbom syndrome, popularly known as delusional parasitosis (1) has been fully clinically described by the Swedish neurologist Karl A.
One example of a shared delusion is delusional parasitosis.
Define delusional parasitosis (DP), its pathophysiology, presentation, diagnosis, and epidemiology.
When allergogoly meets psychiatry: a delusional parasitosis (Ekbom's syndrome).
Secondary delusional parasitosis treated successfully with a combination of clozapine and citalopram.
When other causes of infectious dysesthesias --such as scabies, cercarial dermatitis, and cutaneous larva migrans--are excluded by physical examination or skin biopsy, and no treatable dermatoses are diagnosed, this condition is called delusional infestation, formerly delusional parasitosis.
Striatal lesions in delusional parasitosis revealed by magnetic resonance imagining.