demand-pull inflation

(redirected from Demand Pull)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial.

demand-pull inflation

n
(Economics) See inflation2

demand′-pull` infla′tion


n.
inflation in which rising demand results in a rise in prices. Compare cost-push inflation.
[1955–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.demand-pull inflation - inflation caused by an increase in demand or in the supply of money
inflation, rising prices - a general and progressive increase in prices; "in inflation everything gets more valuable except money"
References in periodicals archive ?
Similar to a car, a strong growth that triggers a larger-than-expected demand pull due to more jobs created can lead to overheating.
Liveris pointed to strong volumes out of its Sadara joint venture facility with Saudi Aramco, with particular strength in the polyurethanes area, and with demand pull from China, India, southeast Asia and central Europe.
Growing awareness of these benefits contributes to increased consumer awareness, end-user demand pull and future adoption of renewable fuels at a larger scale.
That said, the robust growth here aptly demonstrates the vibrancy and maturity of the GCC market and the demand pull that Arab airlines like Etihad create -- especially for higher yielding traffic, the aviation expert said.
This will only take place, however, through a demand pull.
The demand pull was created by product launches, and strong channel spread has brought down the discounts, Srivastava added.
Demand pull inflation occurs when there is an increase in aggregate demand, categorized by the four sections of the economy viz, households, businesses, governments and foreign buyers.
High consumer spending, rising bank lending, exceptionally low interest rates and rising demand deposits will maintain the current demand pull inflation.
He said: "Currently this looks unlikely to change, as we do not foresee an increase in interest rates in the first half of 2012, and are expecting internal demand pull and external cost push inflation to continue over the coming months.
Realistically the rally is cost push rather than demand pull.
In Pakistan, the nature of inflation is not demand pull, which can be controlled through a tight monetary policy.
We have not seen any stalling of the demand pull on the credit side growth, especially on the working capital side,' said Romesh Sobti, IndusInd's managing director and chief executive officer.