dementia

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Related to Dementia with Lewy bodies: vascular dementia, Frontotemporal dementia

de·men·tia

 (dĭ-mĕn′shə)
n.
Loss of cognitive abilities, including memory, concentration, communication, planning, and abstract thinking, resulting from brain injury or from a disease such as Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease. It is sometimes accompanied by emotional disturbance and personality changes.

[Latin dēmentia, madness, from dēmēns, dēment-, senseless; see dement.]

de·men′tial adj.

dementia

(dɪˈmɛnʃə; -ʃɪə)
n
(Pathology) a state of serious emotional and mental deterioration, of organic or functional origin
[C19: from Latin: madness; see dement]

de•men•tia

(dɪˈmɛn ʃə, -ʃi ə)

n.
severely impaired memory and reasoning ability, usu. with disturbed behavior, associated with damaged brain tissue.
[1800–10; < Latin dēmentia madness <dē- de- + mēns mind + -ia -ia]
de•men′tial, adj.

dementia

madness or insanity. Cf. amentia.
See also: Insanity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dementia - mental deterioration of organic or functional origin
insanity - relatively permanent disorder of the mind
alcohol amnestic disorder, alcoholic dementia, Korsakoff's psychosis, Korsakoff's syndrome, Korsakov's psychosis, Korsakov's syndrome, polyneuritic psychosis - dementia observed during the last stages of severe chronic alcoholism; involves loss of memory for recent events although long term memory is intact
presenile dementia - dementia with onset before the age of 65
senile dementia, senile psychosis - dementia of the aged; results from degeneration of the brain in the absence of cerebrovascular disease

dementia

noun
Serious mental illness or disorder impairing a person's capacity to function normally and safely:
Psychiatry: mania.
Psychology: aberration, alienation.
Translations
demence
demens
dementia
demencijasilpnaprotystė
demens

dementia

[dɪˈmenʃɪə] Ndemencia f
senile dementiademencia f senil

dementia

[dɪˈmɛnʃiə dɪˈmɛnʃə] ndémence fdemerara sugar [ˌdɛmərɛərəˈʃʊgər] (British) nsucre m roux, cassonade f

dementia

nSchwachsinn m, → Demenz f (spec); dementia praecoxJugendirresein nt, → Dementia praecox f (spec)

dementia

[dɪˈmɛnʃɪə] n (Med) → demenza

de·men·ti·a

n. demencia, locura; declinación de las funciones mentales;
___ paralytica___ paralítica;
___ praecox___ precoz, esquizofrenia;
organic ______ orgánica;
senile ______ senil.

dementia

n demencia; Alzheimer’s — demencia de Alzheimer, demencia tipo Alzheimer; — pugilistica demencia pugilística; multi-infarct — (ant) demencia vascular, demencia multiinfarto (ant); vascular — demencia vascular
References in periodicals archive ?
However, it is important to accurately diagnose dementia with Lewy bodies as certain drugs could be prescribed to alleviate its symptoms.
Dining that time, 38 percent developed Alzheimer's disease, and 13 percent progressed to probable dementia with Lewy bodies.
has received approval for a new indication for the symptomatic treatment of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) for anti-Alzheimer's agent Aricept (donepezil hydrochloride) in the Philippines, and has commenced information provision activities.
Furthermore, the filamentous Lewy body formation could be observed in early onset of PDD carrying SNCA mutations and Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) [42, 55], and the aggregation of [alpha]-synuclein could be detected in substantia nigra as well as cortex in idiopathic PD patients, which suggests that the accumulation of a-synuclein could be the presynaptic dysfunction attributed to neuronal toxicity caused by various genetic or nongenetic risk factors.
com/article/robin-williams-widow-susan-williams-peo People magazine that her husband suffered from a debilitating brain disease called diffuse Lewy body dementia, or dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB),AaAaAeAeAaAeAeA and that the disease is what led to hisAaAaAeAeAaAeAeA de
October 15, 2015 -- Neural stem cells transplanted into damaged brain sites in mice dramatically improved both motor and cognitive impairments associated with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), according to neurobiologists.
They first address specific conditions and basic mechanisms in dementia and cognitive decline, including Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, corticobasal degeneration, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Gaucher disease, Huntington's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, normal pressure hydrocephalus, Parkinson's disease, Pick's disease, posterior cortical atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, cognitive vascular impairment, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, risk factors, malnutrition, the role of diet in chronic inflammation and innate immunity in Alzheimer's, pathophysiological mechanisms and nutrition, and body composition.
However, in the case of specific diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Multiple System Atrophy (MSA), and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), this protein forms aggregates that cause neurodegeneration.
Differences and similarities in the neuropsychological profile of dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's diseas in the early stage.
Approximately 25% of cognitively normal older adults and nearly 50% of people older than 80 years also show beta-amyloid on PET scans, as do patients with conditions such as dementia with Lewy bodies and cerebral amyloid angiopathy.