Republic of China

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Noun1.Republic of China - a government on the island of Taiwan established in 1949 by Chiang Kai-shek after the conquest of mainland China by the Communists led by Mao ZedongRepublic of China - a government on the island of Taiwan established in 1949 by Chiang Kai-shek after the conquest of mainland China by the Communists led by Mao Zedong
capital of Taiwan, Taipeh, Taipei - the capital of Nationalist China; located in northern Taiwan
Taichung - a city in Taiwan
South China Sea - a tropical arm of the Pacific Ocean near southeastern Asia subject to frequent typhoons
Chinese - a native or inhabitant of Communist China or of Nationalist China
Taiwanese - a native or inhabitant of Taiwan
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather than an aspiring Christian and democratic China, the PRC was allied with the Soviet Union and, from the perspective of many Americans, threatening to spread Communism across Asia.
Although he lives in the US, he travels quite extensively and everywhere he travels he meets Chinese people who want to see a better and more democratic China.
Only when one-party rule is ended and when the people can vote for their government can China eradicate deeply embedded corruption and build a democratic China," Lee said.
Among them is a powerful image executed by a leader of the group, Li Hua (1907-1994), entitled Struggle (1947) from his series Raging Tide; it exemplifies the iconic images Li created to bring about a more democratic China.
including Democratic China, Human Rights in China and China E-Weekly.
Their manifesto, Charter 2008, sketches a free and democratic China where human rights, democracy and the rule of law are paramount.
Apologist Western leaders have suggested that relative economic liberalism and the free market will lead to a more tolerant, open, free and democratic China.
In fact, Niou finds that over a quarter of the respondents are willing to accept either peaceful independence or unification with a prosperous and democratic China.
He says a democratic China "will ultimately come into existence, ending the dream of a Chinese empire.
These two outcomes are not necessarily mutually exclusive--a more democratic China will only be less militant if current nationalism is little more than a guise for a repressed desire for political freedoms and frustration at the Government.
If engagement succeeds, the United States can work with a wealthy and democratic China to promote peace around the globe.

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