Democratic-Republican Party


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Democratic-Republican Party

n.
A political party in the United States that was opposed to the Federalist Party and was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1792 and dissolved in 1828.

Democratic-Republican Party

n
(Historical Terms) US history the antifederalist party originally led by Thomas Jefferson, which developed into the modern Democratic Party

Democrat′ic-Repub′lican Par`ty


n.
a U.S. political party opposed to the Federalist Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1792.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Democratic-Republican Party - a former major political party in the United States in the early 19th century; opposed the old Federalist party; favored a strict interpretation of the constitution in order to limit the powers of the federal government
party, political party - an organization to gain political power; "in 1992 Perot tried to organize a third party at the national level"
References in periodicals archive ?
WHEN was the Democratic-Republican party formed by Thomas Jefferson?
On their part, Members of the American Chamber indicated that, during their recent visit to the US within the framework of the Door-Knocking mission, they met with various US institutions and held 87 meetings, including 54 ones with congressional members from the Democratic-Republican Party.
With Jefferson and Burr both representing the Democratic-Republican Party, the rise of which and other parties unexpected by the country's founders, the electorate used both of their votes on each candidate resulting in the tie.
Elbridge Gerry signed a redistricting law favoring his Democratic-Republican Party -- giving rise to the term ''gerrymandering.''
Because the "Democratic-Republican Party" or the "War Party" was only formed to do one thing: To keep America in a perpetual state of war and to ensure far more hysteria in the Muslim world - with more wars, more spying programs, more sanctions, more planes, more drones, more bombs, more civilian deaths, more special ops forces, more military advisers, more terrorist proxy forces, and definitely more boots on the ground.
The clubs didn't vanish but were absorbed into the nascent Democratic-Republican Party that Jefferson and Madison were forming.
The essays are divided into six sections: Madison's education, his participation in the Constitutional Convention, his authorship of the Bill of Rights, his leadership of the Democratic-Republican Party, his time as president, and, finally, his post-presidency.
In response, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison helped create the Democratic-Republican Party. It called for a weaker federal government and more rights and powers given to states and individual citizens.
The Alien and Sedition Acts were devised by the Federalist-controlled Congress mainly as an attempt to deprive Jefferson's Democratic-Republican Party of a portion of its voting strength by postponing citizenship from five years to 14.

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