denizenship


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

denizenship

(ˈdɛnɪzənˌʃɪp)
n
(Law) the status of a denizen
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
These practices question the extent to which 'denizenship' - the rights afforded to non-citizen residents - continues to be a meaningful concept, as well as highlighting the implications for promoting a cohesive, inclusive and diverse society.
Es mas, recientemente fue conocida la propuesta etico-politica de Zoopolis (Donaldson and Kymlicka 2011), que propone otorgar a los animales ya sea ciudadania (citizenship), derechos de residencia (denizenship) o bien reconocer su soberania:
She also considers the rights to citizenship and political membership claimed by queer bodies and an examination of "new" and alternative forms of citizenship, such as denizenship, urban citizenship, diasporic citizenship, and Indigenous citizenship.
(154) Borrowing from Wolch, Donaldson and Kymlicka coin their vision for a "situated animal ethics" (155) as a "zoopolis", signalling a society that, in order to be just, treats domesticated animals as co-citizens, respects the sovereignty of wild animals who live apart from humans, and affords denizenship to those animals humans perceived as wildlife coexisting with us in urban landscapes.
At the same time, we can identify the trans' formation of political membership through new forms of quasi-citizenship or "denizenship." (8) Here we see forms of "stable association with the polity other than through the medium of citizenship," which consequently test "the frame of our traditional understanding of membership of a political community." (9) In this light, the individual does not necessarily need to be a citizen to enjoy membership in a polity, since non-nationals are entitled to rights deriving from international human rights standards, regardless of their nationality, and from international agreements, as epitomized by the case of