Denominatively

De`nom`i`na´tive`ly


adv.1.By denomination.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, everything that is predicated of something is either predicated essentially, so that neither term adds some extraneous connotation to the signification of the other; or it is predicated denominatively, so that one term does add some extrinsic connotation to the signification of the other.
Ogelthorpe next rebuts Cranmer in a syllogism: the word "body," being predicated, signifies substance; but "substance" is not predicated denominatively; therefore, "it is an essential predication; and so it is his true body, and not the figure of his body." To this, Cranmer counters, "Substantia [substance] may be predicated denominatively in an allegory, or in a metaphor, or in a figurative locution." It is to Ogelthorpe's then objecting that Christ would not use tropes in his last testament because they merely obfuscate and lie that Cranmer retorts, "Yes, he may use them well enough.
Put otherwise, something is called "just" denominatively. [30] In both examples -- black and just(ice) -- the propriety of the term derives from a thing's having a substantial amount or expressing a significant degree of the attribute in quest ion.
differentiate, sometimes denominatively (by attribution) and sometimes by proportionality (and sometimes both at once) compared to applications to contingently, existing things" (p.