denotation

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de·no·ta·tion

 (dē′nō-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act of denoting; indication.
2. Something, such as a sign or symbol, that denotes.
3. Something signified or referred to; a particular meaning of a symbol.
4. The most specific or direct meaning of a word, in contrast to its figurative or associated meanings.

denotation

(ˌdiːnəʊˈteɪʃən)
n
1. the act or process of denoting; indication
2. a particular meaning, esp one given explicitly rather than by suggestion
3. (Linguistics)
a. something designated or referred to. Compare referent, connotation
b. another name for extension11

de•no•ta•tion

(ˌdi noʊˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the explicit or direct meaning or set of meanings of a word or expression, as distinguished from the ideas or meanings associated with or suggested by it. Compare connotation (def. 2).
2. the act or fact of denoting; indication.
3. a word that names or denotes something.
4. a mark, sign, or symbol; indicator.
[1525–35; < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.denotation - the act of indicating or pointing out by name
naming - the verbal act of naming; "the part he failed was the naming of state capitals"
2.denotation - the most direct or specific meaning of a word or expression; the class of objects that an expression refers to; "the extension of `satellite of Mars' is the set containing only Demos and Phobos"
meaning, substance - the idea that is intended; "What is the meaning of this proverb?"

denotation

noun
That which is signified by a word or expression:
Translations
jeljelentésmegjelölés

denotation

[ˌdiːnəʊˈteɪʃən] N
1. (gen) → denotación f (also Ling, Philos); (= meaning) → sentido m
2. (= symbol) → símbolo m, señal f

denotation

n
(Philos, of term, concept) → Denotation f, → Begriffsumfang m; (of word)Bedeutung f
(= name: of object) → Bezeichnung f; (= symbol)Symbol nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Even when words are given a denotative meaning, though, their alien form "desemanticizes" them much like Kristeva's obscene language as the physicality of pronouncing the words (or imagining their sound while reading silently) often dominates the denotative meaning (just as obscene language often has a denotative meaning that is de-emphasized when used).
In forming tension in poetry, the poet's skill is so profound that he takes both the denotative meaning and connotative meaning of the poetry into account, as Li (1979) said:
44) that lacks substantive denotative meaning because it refers to a wide variety of interactions between scholars and those outside the academy.
Durkin and Shire (1991) suggests words such as 'leaves', 'product', 'table', 'high' and 'big' have more than one denotative meaning: a basic everyday meaning, and a specialised meaning in mathematics, which may have implications for understanding.
Although the denotative meaning of the original poem in English remains reasonably constant from song to song, Lombardo's text painting of the poem and its translations varies intriguingly.
denotative meaning. Frankel, a divorced highly successful entrepreneur,
The frequency of the cosmetic denotative meaning and the development of connotative meanings, also common, starting from this core sense of the common lexis, require the return to the lexicographical definitions and their correlation with the reality of texts.
So an equivalence can be established between English [N (object) + V(transitive)ing], (usually) when expressing a denotative meaning, and Italian [V + N].For example, if we wanted to translate a recent buzzword used in Italian media, that is, decreto salva-Italia, we could render it as Italy-saving decree.
This attitudinal and axiological underdeterminacy does not undermine the possibility for establishing the prototypical denotative meaning of evaluative markers from which pragmatic effects are derived, ranging from ludicity, "meiosis, diminitivum puerile, child/lover/pet-centred speech situations, emotivity, familiarity and intimacy, sympathy and empathy" (Crocco-Galeas 2002:153) to derogation, dismissal, pejorative attitude, etc.
For example, some "primitive" tribes seem to own a rhythmic language which sends messages (in the proper, denotative meaning of the terms) in the absence of words.