sensory deprivation

(redirected from Deprivation, sensory)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical.

sensory deprivation

n.
Deprivation of external sensory stimulation, as by prolonged isolation.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sensory deprivation

n
(Psychology) psychol an experimental situation in which all stimulation is cut off from the sensory receptors
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sen′sory depriva′tion



n.
extreme reduction of environmental stimuli, often leading to cognitive, perceptual, or behavioral disorientation or, in infants, developmental damage.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sensory deprivation - a form of psychological torture inflicted by depriving the victim of all sensory input
torturing, torture - the deliberate, systematic, or wanton infliction of physical or mental suffering by one or more persons in an attempt to force another person to yield information or to make a confession or for any other reason; "it required unnatural torturing to extract a confession"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

sensory deprivation

nReizabschirmung f, → sensorische Deprivation (spec)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
He provides a useful history of CIA and military experiments with hypnosis, sleep deprivation, sensory deprivation, electroshock, and drugs in coercive interrogations via ethically challenged programs (Project Chatter in 1949, Project Bluebird in 1950, Artichoke in 1951, and MKULTRA in 1953), often upon unwitting human subjects, in an attempt to find a "brainwashing" mechanism.
So President Bush made it the official policy of the United States to subject its prisoners to sleep deprivation, sensory deprivation, hypothermia, sexual humiliation, mock execution, the use of attack dogs, the application of electric shocks and the withholding of food, water and medical care.
Sleep deprivation, sensory disorientation, cultivating anxiety, solitary confinement, mock execution, severe humiliation, mind-altering drugs, and threats of violence are among forms of psychological torture.