morpheme

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mor·pheme

 (môr′fēm′)
n.
A meaningful linguistic unit that cannot be divided into smaller meaningful parts. The word man and the suffix -ed (as in walked) are morphemes.

[French morphème, blend of Greek morphē, form and French phonème, phoneme; see phoneme.]

mor·phem′ic adj.
mor·phem′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

morpheme

(ˈmɔːfiːm)
n
(Linguistics) linguistics a speech element having a meaning or grammatical function that cannot be subdivided into further such elements
[C20: from French, from Greek morphē form, coined on the model of phoneme; see -eme]
morˈphemic adj
morˈphemically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mor•pheme

(ˈmɔr fim)

n.
any of the minimal grammatical units of a language, each constituting a word or meaningful part of a word that cannot be divided into smaller meaningful parts, as the, write, or the -ed of waited. Compare allomorph (def. 2).
[1895–1900; < French morphème; see morph-, -eme]
mor•phe′mic, adj.
mor•phe′mi•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

morpheme

A word or part of a word that cannot be further divided into smaller elements.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.morpheme - minimal meaningful language unit; it cannot be divided into smaller meaningful units
language unit, linguistic unit - one of the natural units into which linguistic messages can be analyzed
allomorph - a variant phonological representation of a morpheme; "the final sounds of `bets' and `beds' and `horses' and `oxen' are allomorphs of the English plural morpheme"
free form, free morpheme - a morpheme that can occur alone
bound form, bound morpheme - a morpheme that occurs only as part of a larger construction; eg an -s at the end of plural nouns
classifier - a word or morpheme used in some languages in certain contexts (such as counting) to indicate the semantic class to which the counted item belongs
ending, termination - the end of a word (a suffix or inflectional ending or final morpheme); "I don't like words that have -ism as an ending"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
морфема
morfém
morfeemi
morfem
morféma
morfemaморфема
morfem
морфема

morpheme

[ˈmɔːfiːm] Nmorfema m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

morpheme

nMorphem nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

morpheme

[ˈmɔːfiːm] nmorfema m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance the word yesil (green) was not included in the original root list, because TLA considers this word as derived as yas (fresh) + il (derivational morpheme).
Rather than having to explain away the -ut-, I would see it as a combination of the derivational morpheme =ud= (see p.
Diachronic reasons underlie this difference, but synchronic explanations may be stated: i) position of the suffix (--vel if it is the last morpheme of the word (permeavel 'permeable'), excluding inflection;--bil--if it is not the last derivational morpheme of the word (permeabilidade 'permeability')); and ii) activity or inactivity of the suffix to the word formation pattern (--vel if it is active, that is, if the affix plays a role in the formation of the word;--bil--if it is inactive, that is, if the affix does not work on the morphological pattern that constructs the word).
Nonfinites formed with the derivational morpheme -m- were observed with a special tense, which W.
It would be inconsistent, therefore, to analyze affixation, which adds an explicit derivational morpheme, in the Simplex Word as well as to deal with conversion, which lacks derivational marking, in the Complex Word.
Nominals with the derivational morpheme =and= are known (e.g., ag=and=i (occupation); nurandige (a plant); simandige 'cypress?').
1/2/3S (k)/(z) 1st/2nd/3rd person singular from the k-paradigm / z-paradigm 1/2/3P (k)/(z) 1st/2nd/3rd person plural from the k-paradigm / z-paradigm Abl Ablative Abil Abilitative Acc Accusative Agn Agentive Aor Aorist Aux Auxiliary Caus Causative CmpMrk Compound Marker Com Commutative Cond Conditional Conn Connector Cop Copula Dat Dative Der Derivational morpheme Dvb Deverbalizer EpCop Epistemological Copula Evid Evidential Fem Feminine Fut Future Gen Genitive Masc Masculine Nec Necessitative Neg Negative Loc Locative Obl Oblique Pass Passive Past Past Pl Plural Poss Possessive (e.g., 3S.Poss: 3rd person singular possessive) PostP Postposition Pot Potential Prob Probability Prog Progressive Que Question Rel Relativizer RepPast Reported Past Top Topic Marker
Just as a derivational morpheme may be understood to be productive when it is used to produce new formations based on native items or borrowed lexemes, the use of a derivational marker for adaptation also gives a (limited) indication of the marker's productivity (see Dressler & Ladanyi 2000: 119-122, based on the the notions of primary/secondary productivity articulated in Wurzel 1989).
As in other Semitic languages, the majority of verbs are built upon a triconsonantal root, each of which may yield one or more of six verbal stems: the G-stem or basic stem, the D-stem or transitivizing-denominative verbal stem, the C-stem or causative verbal stem, and the tG-, tD-, and tC-stems, to which a derivational morpheme, t-, was prefixed before the first root consonant.
(3) When the derivative belongs in an inflectional paradigm, a further distinction must be established between the absence of any morpheme and the absence of any derivational morpheme while an inflectional morpheme is present.