Despitous

De`spit´ous


a.1.Despiteous; very angry; cruel.
He was to sinful man not despitous.
- Chaucer.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
12: Compared to the Stimulus's "et se pro ipso morti tradere," D's "suffred for thi loue despites deth" again appends a reference to love and further emphasizes Christ's sacrifice by adding "despites"; Hf speaks of "despitous de[??]" (fol.
153-156: The following passage was added to the Stimulus: "ffor [??]e wich [??]e sonne suffred painful deth and despitous. Louelich lorde and spouse ihesu crist, write in myn hert so [??]at I mowe rede [??]i loue towar[d] me and [??]i sorwe for me, and [??]e mende for hym euermore he dwellyng fresch in my herte"; see also Hf (fol.
In nothyngbe my ioie bot in[??]e andfor[??]e, and with alle myn herte I beseche [??]e [??]at for no [??]ynge be I disesed, ne sort bot for synne, ffor [??]e wich [??]e sonne suffredpainful deth and despitous. Louelich lorde and spouse ihesu 155 crist, write in myn hert so [??]at I mowe rede [??]i loue towar [d] me and [??]i sorwe for me, and [??]e mende for hym euermore he dwellyng fresch in my herte.
(8) The line without the virgule (as represented in Robinson for example), I would argue, reads that Palamon looked physically "despitous." When the breaks are marked, however, I would argue that we get a different reading of these lines.