Dessalines


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Des·sa·lines

 (dĕ-sä-lēn′), Jean Jacques 1758?-1806.
Emperor of Haiti (1804-1806) who defeated the French (1803) to gain independence for the island. His despotic rule led to his assassination.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Dessalines

(French desalin)
n
(Biography) Jean Jacques (ʒɑ̃ ʒɑk). ?1758–1806, emperor of Haiti (1804–06) after driving out the French; assassinated
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
The "Emperor" Dessalines, come to power in 1804, massacred all the whites on the island.
| WHEN did Jean Jacques Dessalines proclaim Haiti an independent republic?
Moise too was criticised during the protest."Jovenel Moise should step down because he is part of the reason why Trump believes he is allowed to trash talk the country," said Stephane Cambry, a supporter of the opposition Pitit Dessalines Party.
Figueroa's consideration of Walcott's treatment of Jean-Jacques Dessalines highlights a nagging theme, the pitfalls of utilitarian invocation of the Revolution, as a "floating signifier" that has been "used, reinvented, or imagined" (pp.
They will also prompt a revision of the genealogy of modern science that, beyond Comte's, must include the radical poetics and politics of Haiti's first leader, Jean-Jacques Dessalines, the magico-religious beliefs of the Haitian peasantry, and the magical tricks of an anonymous young Haitian girl.
All but one name came from those in William Wells Brown's (1863) The Black Man; three of the men were African American but not from the borders of the United States, and two of those names were well- known to the school principals as leaders of the only successful slave revolt: L'Ouverture and Dessalines. Black children and youth would learn of their potential for racial resistance as they entered schools named for these singular men.