destructive interference


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destructive interference

n.
The effective decrease in the overall amplitude of a resultant wave when the peaks and troughs of two or more constituent waves overlap and cancel each other.
References in periodicals archive ?
He clarified that some states' governments claim that they adhere to the ethics and they consider themselves as custodians on the provisions of the international law and the UN Charter while at the same time they adopt policies that violate the noble moral principles and they exploit them to implement their destructive interference agendas.
Standard testing was insufficient in predicting the performance of the datalink, as reflections from the landscape at such altitudes causes significant destructive interference in otherwise clear line-of-sight conditions.
To change the directionality of the array when transmitting, a beamformer controls the phase and relative amplitude of the signal at each transmitter, in order to create a pattern of constructive and destructive interference in the wavefront.
But if the phases of the new and old photons aren't exactly aligned, the waves can produce destructive interference.
Wu argues that activism of this period was not entirely fractious, despite separatism, intense personal rivalries between leaders, disagreements over ideology and strategy, and the destructive interference of COINTELPRO, the FBI program to infiltrate and disrupt radical organizations.
It is also worth noting that Muller's invention uses the wave field synthesis technique that builds 3-D sound fields to either cancel or reinforce sound waves with constructive or destructive interference, to place sound at pinpoint locations.
However, when a signal has a larger bandwidth available, some parts of such a signal might experience constructive interference and raise their level, while other parts of the signal suffer destructive interference an experience serious attenuation (almost disappearing in some cases).
The dark bands, also known as lines of optical singularity, are black lines where complete destructive interference occurs.
This view was robustly challenged by a speaker from Pakistan who pointed out that "Pakistan is bleeding too", and that it was not in the interest of the country to pursue such a policy of destructive interference.
It also appeared that the geometry of the geological structure (possible synform) has led to destructive interference (a cancelling) of the magnetic signal in the centre of the structure, resulting in an apparent weak or absent response.