constable

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Related to Detective Constable: police constable

con·sta·ble

 (kŏn′stə-bəl, kŭn′-)
n.
1. A peace officer with less authority and smaller jurisdiction than a sheriff, empowered to serve writs and warrants and make arrests.
2. A medieval officer of high rank, usually serving as military commander in the absence of a monarch.
3. The governor of a royal castle.
4. Chiefly British A police officer.

[Middle English, from Old French conestable, from Late Latin comes stabulī, officer of the stable : Latin comes, officer, companion; see ei- in Indo-European roots + Latin stabulī, genitive of stabulum, stable; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

con′sta·ble·ship′ n.

constable

(ˈkʌnstəbəl; ˌkɒn-)
n
1. (Law) (in Britain, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, etc) a police officer of the lowest rank
2. (Law) any of various officers of the peace, esp one who arrests offenders, serves writs, etc
3. the keeper or governor of a royal castle or fortress
4. (Historical Terms) (in medieval Europe) the chief military officer and functionary of a royal household, esp in France and England
5. (Historical Terms) an officer of a hundred in medieval England, originally responsible for raising the military levy but later assigned other administrative duties
[C13: from Old French, from Late Latin comes stabulī officer in charge of the stable, from Latin comes comrade + stabulum dwelling, stable; see also count2]
ˈconstableˌship n

Constable

(ˈkʌnstəbəl)
n
(Biography) John. 1776–1837, English landscape painter, noted particularly for his skill in rendering atmospheric effects of changing light

con•sta•ble

(ˈkɒn stə bəl; esp. Brit. ˈkʌn-)

n.
1. an officer of the peace in a town or township, having minor police and judicial functions.
2. (in Great Britain and some Commonwealth countries) a police officer, esp. of the lowest rank.
3. an officer of high rank in medieval monarchies.
4. the keeper or governor of a royal fortress or castle.
[1200–50; Middle English conestable < Anglo-French, Old French < Late Latin comes stabulī count2 of the stable1]

Con•sta•ble

(ˈkʌn stə bəl, ˈkɒn-)

n.
John, 1776–1837, English painter.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.constable - a lawman with less authority and jurisdiction than a sheriffconstable - a lawman with less authority and jurisdiction than a sheriff
law officer, lawman, peace officer - an officer of the law
2.constable - English landscape painter (1776-1837)Constable - English landscape painter (1776-1837)
3.constable - a police officer of the lowest rankconstable - a police officer of the lowest rank
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
police officer, policeman, officer - a member of a police force; "it was an accident, officer"

constable

noun
Chiefly British. A member of a law-enforcement agency:
Informal: cop, law.
Slang: bull, copper, flatfoot, fuzz, gendarme, heat, man (often uppercase).
Chiefly British: bobby, peeler.
Translations
شُرطي بَريطاني
strážník
politibetjent
löggæslumaîur
policijapolicininkas
policists
strážnik
stražnik
konstapel
polis memuru

constable

[ˈkʌnstəbl] N (Brit) (also police constable) → agente mf de policía, policía mf; (as form of address) → señor(a) policía

constable

[ˈkɒnstəbəl] n (British)agent m de police, gendarme m chief constable

constable

n (Brit: = police constable) → Polizist(in) m(f); (in address) → Herr Wachtmeister, Frau Wachtmeisterin

constable

[ˈkʌnstəbl] n (Brit) (also police constable) → agente m/f (di polizia)

constable

(ˈkanstəbl) , ((American) ˈka:n-) noun
a policeman, especially one not of high rank.
conˈstabulary (-ˈstӕbju-) nounplural conˈstabularies
a police force.
References in periodicals archive ?
followed flat a t"It has been a huge effort from the team to reunite the puppies with their mother Detective Constable Nick Kershaw
Anyone who may have witnessed the incident or may have private CCTV in the area is asked to contact Detective Constable Rob Sedlatschek from Middlesbrough CID on 101, quoting event number 036685.
Detective Constable Sello explained that if surrounding villages such as Tonota had such cases, it meant Francistown might be worse, adding that some of the cases went unreported.
"Our investigators took statements from a number of police officers, obtained and analysed relevant police records, identified an indication of misconduct for the sergeant and the detective constable, and interviewed them under misconduct caution.
Detective Constables Susan Pritchard, Julie Timerick and Justin Brown, Detective Chief Inspector Pete Hill and Detective Sergeant Owen Fell were praised for their "dedication, professionalism and determination" which led to Dominic Wallis and Elizabeth Ellis being convicted of the murder of Dionne.
A detective constable told District Judge Barney McElholm she could connect both defendants to the charges.
Detective Constable Jim Ander-son was recognised as an outstanding performer for his part in the investigation into the sex crimes of shamed weatherman Fred Talbot.
Detective Constable Paul McRoberts said: "This was a violent attack and we're unsure what the motive was."
Detective Constable Todd told the Advertiser: "Thankfully the shopkeeper was not injured and whilst only one bottle of alcohol may have been taken from the shop, to be threatened with a knife is a very frightening experience."
Despite retiring in 2011, the detective constable returned soon after in the role of gatekeeper for forensic submissions - putting good use to his "exacting standards".
This was followed up by a visit from a man dressed in what resembled a uniform and claiming to be Detective Constable Shah.
Detective Constable Glover, of Carys Close, denied the allegations from the start.