Deuteronomist

(redirected from Deuteronomic History)

Deuteronomist

(ˌdjuːtəˈrɒnəmɪst)
n
(Bible) one of the writers of Deuteronomy
References in periodicals archive ?
Diana Edelman has asked each of her contributors to concentrate on one of the five books of the Deuteronomic history, Deuteronomy--Kings, and to consider if that book was (or was not) authoritative in the late Persian or early Hellenistic period when it is generally agreed that they all did in fact exist, and if so why.
He adds historical summary, he reviews the Deuteronomic History, and he reflects on the nature of kingship.
Among his topics are the day as a unit of measure, when the year began and ended, the use of eras, genealogical lists containing chronological information, sources of the priestly genealogical chronology, chronological sources of the Deuteronomic history, and historical reconstructions.
Huldah and the Men of Anathoth: Women in Leadership in the Deuteronomic History.
Disabling Israelite Leadership: 2 Samuel 6:23 and Other Images of Disability in the Deuteronomic History," by Jeremy Schipper, explores Deuteronomic images in Deuteronomy, Judges, Kings, etc.
Moses and the Deuteronomist: A Literary Study of the Deuteronomic History, New York, The Seabury Press.
Noth in his highly influential thesis about the composition of Deuteronomy and the Deuteronomic History (1943), in which the plural passages were attributed to the Deuteronomist rather than to the original Deuteronomy.
The Deuteronomic History and the Book of Chronicles: Scribal Works in an Oral World.
In this light, OT narratives that attempt to neutralize dissent and present continuity with the past, such as Chronicles, are "cold"; attempts to move society beyond its current state, such as is attempted in the Deuteronomic history, are "hot.
It is far from being a homogeneous unified work, for the primary edition of Deuteronomic History was edited and revised by multiple authors.
To establish this position, Person first devotes chapters to demonstrating the post-exilic date of the Deuteronomic History and the Book of Jeremiah, based on both textual considerations when comparing the MT and LXX versions, and on thematic concerns.
In particular, his later dating of the Deuteronomic History meant he needed to explain the book's relationship with other Old Testament books, particularly the Book of Chronicles.