devolution

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dev·o·lu·tion

 (dĕv′ə-lo͞o′shən, dē′və-)
n.
1. A passing down or descent through successive stages of time or a process.
2. Transference, as of rights or qualities, to a successor.
3. Delegation of authority or duties to a subordinate or substitute.
4. A transfer of powers from a central government to local units.
5. Biology Degeneration.

[Late Latin dēvolūtiō, dēvolūtiōn-, from Latin dēvolūtus, past participle of dēvolvere, to roll down, fall to; see devolve.]

dev′o·lu′tion·ar′y (-shə-nĕr′ē) adj.
dev′o·lu′tion·ist n.

devolution

(ˌdiːvəˈluːʃən)
n
1. the act, fact, or result of devolving
2. a passing onwards or downwards from one stage to another
3. (Biology) another word for degeneration3
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a transfer or allocation of authority, esp from a central government to regional governments or particular interests
[C16: from Medieval Latin dēvolūtiō a rolling down, from Latin dēvolvere to roll down, sink into; see devolve]
ˌdevoˈlutionary adj
ˌdevoˈlutionist n, adj

dev•o•lu•tion

(ˌdɛv əˈlu ʃən; esp. Brit. ˈdi və-)

n.
1. the act or fact of devolving; passage onward from stage to stage.
2. the passing on to a successor of property or an unexercised right.
3. disappearance or simplification of structure or function in the course of evolution.
4. the transfer of power or authority from a central government to a local government.
[1535–45; (< Middle French) < Medieval Latin dēvolūtiō; see devolve, revolution]
dev`o•lu′tion•ar′y, adj., n.
dev`o•lu′tion•ist, n.

devolution

- A passing down from stage to stage or the passing of property, rights, or authority from one person to another; it implies moving backward.
See also related terms for rights.

devolution

The transfer of power from a central government to smaller units such as regional authorities.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.devolution - the process of declining from a higher to a lower level of effective power or vitality or essential quality
physical process, process - a sustained phenomenon or one marked by gradual changes through a series of states; "events now in process"; "the process of calcification begins later for boys than for girls"
attack - the onset of a corrosive or destructive process (as by a chemical agent); "the film was sensitive to attack by acids"; "open to attack by the elements"
obsolescence - the process of becoming obsolete; falling into disuse or becoming out of date; "a policy of planned obsolescence"
macular degeneration - eye disease caused by degeneration of the cells of the macula lutea and results in blurred vision; can cause blindness
evolution, development - a process in which something passes by degrees to a different stage (especially a more advanced or mature stage); "the development of his ideas took many years"; "the evolution of Greek civilization"; "the slow development of her skill as a writer"
2.devolution - the delegation of authority (especially from a central to a regional government)
governing, government activity, government, governance, administration - the act of governing; exercising authority; "regulations for the governing of state prisons"; "he had considerable experience of government"
delegating, relegating, relegation, delegation, deputation - authorizing subordinates to make certain decisions

devolution

noun transfer of power, decentralization, distribution of power, surrender of power, relinquishment of power We are talking about devolution for Scotland.
Translations

devolution

[ˌdiːvəˈluːʃən] Ndelegación f (de poderes) (Pol) → traspaso m de competencias (Brit) (Pol) → descentralización f
most Welsh people want devolutionla mayoría de los galeses quieren la autonomía

devolution

[ˌdɛvəˈluːʃən ˌdiːvəˈluːʃən] ndécentralisation f

devolution

n
(of power)Übertragung f (→ from … to von … auf +acc); (Pol) → Dezentralisierung f
(Jur, of property, = active devolving) → Übertragung f; (= being devolved)Übergang m
(Biol) → Rückentwicklung f, → Degeneration f

devolution

[ˌdiːvəˈluːʃn] n (Pol) → decentramento

dev·o·lu·tion

n. devolución. V.: catabolism
References in periodicals archive ?
Firstly, most of them are making it clear they want full independance from the UK, not just devolved government.
Prime Minister Tony Blair and Irish Taoiseach Bertie Ahern were unveiling their plans today for securing devolved government for Northern Ireland.
If this is the level of devolved government we might as well pack up and go back to Westminster.
The message came as Ulster Unionist Party leader David Trimble said disbandment was needed to get devolved government restored in Northern Ireland.
Members of the Province's Assembly were preparing to vote on First Minister David Trimble's proposals for devolved government in the shadow of a new row over decommissioning of terrorist weapons.
The devolved government also targets to raise local revenue by more than 50 per cent to receive increased funding and a reward from the Commission of Revenue Authority (CRA) under the new criteria of distributing tax revenue among the 47 counties.
class="MsoNormalMr Silver Ncurai and Justus Njagi Kanampiu want the court to stop implementation of the budget on claims that the county assembly and devolved government, who are the respondents, did not follow the Constitution formulating the budget.
The UK government has moved a considerable distance to accommodate the concerns of the devolved government and other parliamentarians.
It means the people of Northern Ireland are not being served by an elected and accountable devolved government."
Could a devolved government, for example, start charging to see a doctor?
Following the creation of the National Assembly in 1999, as senior director he was a central figure in the operation of devolved government in Wales.
Wales' former top civil servant Sir Jon Shortridge, a key figure in securing devolved Government, will also collect an award today.