Devonian

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De·vo·ni·an

 (dĭ-vō′nē-ən)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being the period of geologic time from about 416 to 359 million years ago, the fourth period of the Paleozoic Era. The Devonian Period is characterized by the development of lobe-finned fishes, the appearance of amphibians and insects, and the first forests. See Table at geologic time.
n.
The Devonian Period.

[After Devon, a county of southwest England.]

Devonian

(dəˈvəʊnɪən)
adj
1. (Geological Science) of, denoting, or formed in the fourth period of the Palaeozoic era, between the Silurian and Carboniferous periods, lasting 60-70 million years during which amphibians first appeared
2. (Placename) of or relating to Devon
n
(Geological Science) the Devonian the Devonian period or rock system

De•vo•ni•an

(dəˈvoʊ ni ən)

adj.
1. noting or pertaining to a period of the Paleozoic Era, 405 million to 345 million years ago, characterized by the dominance of fishes and the advent of amphibians and ammonites.
2. of or pertaining to Devonshire, England.
n.
3. the Devonian Period or System.
[1605–15; < Medieval Latin Devoni(a) Devon + -an1]

De·vo·ni·an

(dĭ-vō′nē-ən)
The fourth period of the Paleozoic Era, from about 408 to 360 million years ago, characterized by the appearance of forests, amphibians, and insects. See Chart at geologic time.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Devonian - from 405 million to 345 million years agoDevonian - from 405 million to 345 million years ago; preponderance of fishes and appearance of amphibians and ammonites
Paleozoic, Paleozoic era - from 544 million to about 230 million years ago
Translations
devon

Devonian

[deˈvəʊnɪən] ADJ (Geol) → devónico
References in classic literature ?
The main points of interest consist, first in some highly fossiliferous strata, belonging to the Devonian or Carboniferous period; secondly, in proofs of a late small rise of the land; and lastly, in a solitary and superficial patch of yellowish limestone or travertin, which contains numerous impressions of leaves of trees, together with land-shells, not now existing.
I need give only one instance, namely, the manner in which the fossils of the Devonian system, when this system was first discovered, were at once recognised by palaeontologists as intermediate in character between those of the overlying carboniferous, and underlying Silurian system.