dhole

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dhole

 (dōl)
n.
A wild Asian dog (Cuon alpinus) having reddish fur and large ears.

[Perhaps from Kannada tōḷa, wolf.]

dhole

(dəʊl)
n
(Animals) a fierce canine mammal, Cuon alpinus, of the forests of central and SE Asia, having a reddish-brown coat and rounded ears: hunts in packs
[C19: of uncertain origin]

dhole

(doʊl)

n.
a wild Asian dog, Cuon alpinus, hunting in packs.
[1827]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dhole - fierce wild dog of the forests of central and southeast Asia that hunts in packsdhole - fierce wild dog of the forests of central and southeast Asia that hunts in packs
wild dog - any of various undomesticated mammals of the family Canidae that are thought to resemble domestic dogs as distinguished from jackals or wolves
Cuon, Cyon, genus Cuon, genus Cyon - Asiatic wild dog
Translations
dhole
References in classic literature ?
Akela knew something of the dholes, too, for he said to Mowgli quietly, "It is better to die in a Full Pack than leaderless and alone.
"Thou art indeed an Outlier," Mowgli called back; "but we will speak when the dholes are dead.
"At least he did not die THEN, though none waited his coming down with a strong body to hold him safe against the water, as a certain old fat, deaf, yellow Flathead would wait for a Manling--yea, though there were all the dholes of the Dekkan on his trail.
I will make me known to the dholes, so that they shall follow me very closely."
Thou wilt stay here, Kaa, till I come again with my dholes?"
The dholes are a very silent people as a rule, and they have no manners even in their own Jungle.
As Mowgli told Kaa, he had many little thorns under his tongue, and slowly and deliberately he drove the dholes from silence to growls, from growls to yells, and from yells to hoarse slavery ravings.
Ye be true dholes, but to my thinking over much of one kind.
When he came to the last tree he took the garlic and rubbed himself all over carefully, and the dholes yelled with scorn.
He had slipped down the tree-trunk, and headed like the wind in bare feet for the Bee Rocks, before the dholes saw what he would do.
"One tooth does not kill a hundred unless it be a cobra's, and many of the dholes took water swiftly when they saw the Little People rise."
It was Won-tolla, the Outlier, and he said never a word, but continued his horrible sport beside the dholes. They had been long in the water now, and were swimming wearily, their coats drenched and heavy, their bushy tails dragging like sponges, so tired and shaken that they, too, were silent, watching the pair of blazing eyes that moved abreast.