diarrhea

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di·ar·rhe·a

 (dī′ə-rē′ə)
n.
Excessive and frequent evacuation of watery feces.

[Middle English diaria, from Medieval Latin, from Late Latin diarrhoea, from Greek diarroia, from diarrein, to flow through : dia-, dia- + rhein, to flow, run; see sreu- in Indo-European roots.]

di′ar·rhe′al, di′ar·rhe′ic (-ĭk), di′ar·rhet′ic (-rĕt′ĭk) adj.

di•ar•rhe•a

or di•ar•rhoe•a

(ˌdaɪ əˈri ə)

n.
an intestinal disorder characterized by frequent and fluid fecal evacuations.
[1350–1400; Middle English diaria < Late Latin diarrhoea < Greek diárrhoia a flowing through]
di`ar•rhe′al, di`ar•rhe′ic, di`ar•rhet′ic (-ˈrɛt ɪk) adj.

diarrhea

“Watery stools” can be caused by any condition that causes food residue to be rushed through the large intestine too quickly to allow water absorption. This may be due to bacterial irritation of the canal.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diarrhea - frequent and watery bowel movements; can be a symptom of infection or food poisoning or colitis or a gastrointestinal tumor
dysentery - an infection of the intestines marked by severe diarrhea
symptom - (medicine) any sensation or change in bodily function that is experienced by a patient and is associated with a particular disease
the shits, the trots - obscene terms for diarrhea
Montezuma's revenge - diarrhea contracted in Mexico or Central America
Translations
průjem
diaré
ripuli
proljev
下痢
설사
diarré
อาการท้องร่วง
bệnh tiêu chảy

diarrhoea

(daiəˈriə) (American) diarrhea noun
too much liquid in and too frequent emptying of the bowels. He has diarrhoea.

diarrhea

إِسْهَال průjem diaré Durchfall διάρροια diarrea ripuli diarrhée proljev diarrea 下痢 설사 diarree diaré biegunka diarreia понос diarré อาการท้องร่วง ishal bệnh tiêu chảy 腹泻

di·ar·rhe·a

n. diarrea;
acute ______ severa;
___ infantile___ infantil;
___ of the newborn___ epidémica del recién nacido;
dysenteric ______ disentérica;
emotional ______ emocional;
lienteric ______ lientérica;
mucous ______ mucosa;
nervous ______ nerviosa;
pancreatic ______ pancreática;
purulent ______ purulenta;
summer ______ estival o de verano;
travelers' ______ del viajero. V. cuadro en la página 97.

diarrhea

n diarrea; traveler’s — diarrea del viajero
References in periodicals archive ?
Making sure you have rehydration salts in your medicine cabinet at home will help you stay hydrated if you do unfortunately become unwell with sickness and diahorrea over the festive period.
They have lower instances of gastrointestinal illnessses such as diahorrea and vomiting.
Diahorrea, abdominal cramps and, at times, fever and vomiting.
Much of the reduction in child mortality rates have been attributed to, and analysed in the context of, clinical interventions, particularty those devoted to increase the distribution of rotavirus vaccines, zinc supplements and oral rehydration salts solutions to prevent and treat diahorrea, and antibiotics and immunization against haemophilus influenza type B, pneumococcus, measles and whooping cough (pertussis) to treat and prevent pneumonia.
He said that with the provision of safe drinking water, the residents of these neglected colonies would not fall prey to water borne diseases like Diahorrea, Jaundice etc.
The survey asks people to list what time they attended, to pinpoint the stall they ate at and to say if they have had vomiting, diahorrea or abdominal symptoms afterward.
But Sunday Mail doctor Gareth Smith insisted there were no miracle cures, adding: "It's important to stay hydrated if you have vomiting and diahorrea and drinking flat coke as opposed to fizzy may be easier to keep down.
Children are also being vaccinated against epidemics such as diahorrea, cholera, diphtheria and malaria which may break out in the wake of torrential rains and floods.
An inquest heard Ellen Minihan, 26, went to the A&E Department of Tallaght Hospital last January with a history of headaches, vomiting and diahorrea.
Sufferers are unable to absorb vital nutrients and because of this are prone to severe bouts of diahorrea, which Dr Pearson said could be "life-threatening".