Arbus

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Ar·bus

 (är′bəs), Diane 1923-1971.
American photographer best known for her portraits of prostitutes, transvestites, persons with physical deformities, and other unconventional subjects.

Arbus

(ˈɑːbəs)
n
(Biography) Diane, original name Diane Nemerov. 1923–71, US photographer, noted esp for her portraits of vagrants, dwarfs, transvestites, etc
References in periodicals archive ?
Every photographer learns and then builds up on their style, initially I was inspired by local and international photographers who were aesthetically quite strong especially Diane Arbus's work which led me to document in Lyari and Peshawar during my under grad school days.
En el mismo terreno fotografico se toca la obra de Diane Arbus, neoyorkina, amante del retrato individual o en grupo.
Residents and neighbors include actor Noah Emmerich (whose dad was art dealer Andre Emmerich), Amy Arbus (daughter of Diane Arbus), DJ Sasha, and singer-songwriter Teddy Thompson.
This is the first exhibition to feature the portfolio that photographer Diane Arbus was working on at the end of her life.
DIANE ARBUS (1923-71) was one of the most-original and -influential artists of the 20th century.
The feature also talked about writer-poet Sylvia Plath; Henrietta Lacks, whose cancer cells were taken from her body without permission and led to a medical revolution; Margaret Abbott, the first American woman to win an Olympic championship; transgender pioneer Marsha P Johnson; Ada Lovelace, a gifted mathematician credited as the first computer programmer; photographer Diane Arbus and feminist poet Qiu Jin, among others.
Dos siglos, 115 fotografias, 64 artistas y una sola coleccion, la de Pedro Slim, cuyo acervo es de los mas fascinantes, y que coloca bajo el mismo techo nombres como los de Lola Alvarez Bravo, Diane Arbus, Hector Garcia, Larry Clark, Graciela Iturbide, John Dugdale, Antonio Reynoso, Lee Friedlander, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Duane Michals, Antonio Salazar, Francisco Toledo, Helmut Newton y Sebastiao Salgado.
A decade earlier, the posthumous monograph Diane Arbus had revealed the seldom-seen denizens of a world that moved in the same orbit as the secret Paris traversed by Brassai in the 1930s and the louche haunts frequented by Goldin and her cohort in the late '70s and '80s.
Others, like the woman in a black and white Diane Arbus image posed with her baby monkey, are strangers to us.
Fosso's work is often compared to that of the renowned American photographer Diane Arbus. But in some ways their perspectives on humanity are very different, in that Arbus illustrates what is unique in every individual, where Fosso's work highlights the fact that perhaps our identity is far more fluid then we think, together with the way we are constantly creating new and different versions of ourselves.
There was a time, back in the 1960s, when New York's art institutions were distinctly lukewarm about Diane Arbus's (1923-71) photography.
In a paper written for her high school English class in 1939, the teenage Diane Arbus wrote: "Everything that has been on earth has been different from any other thing.