dick

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dick 1

 (dĭk)
n. Slang
A detective.

[Shortening and alteration of detective.]

dick 2

 (dĭk) Slang
n.
1. Vulgar A penis.
2. Vulgar A person, especially a man, regarded as mean or contemptible.
3. Chiefly British A fellow; a guy.
tr.v. dicked, dick·ing, dicks Vulgar
1. To have sexual intercourse with. Used of a man.
2. To treat (someone) meanly or unfairly; exploit or cheat. Often used with over.
Phrasal Verbs:
dick around Vulgar
1. To spend time idly; fool around.
2. To be sexually promiscuous. Used of men.
3. To exploit or cheat (someone).
dick up Vulgar
To botch or bungle.

[From Dick, nickname for Richard.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dick

(dɪk)
n
chiefly US a slang word for detective
[C20: by shortening and alteration from detective; probably influenced by proper name Dick]

dick

(dɪk)
n
1. Brit a fellow or person
2. clever dick Brit a person who is obnoxiously opinionated or self-satisfied; know-all
3. a slang word for penis
[C16 (meaning: fellow): from the name Dick, familiar form of Richard, applied generally (like Jack) to any fellow, lad, etc; hence, C19: penis]
Usage: The third sense of this word was formerly considered to be taboo and it was labelled as such in older editions of Collins English Dictionary. However, it has now become acceptable in speech, although some older or more conservative people may object to its use
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dick

(dɪk)

n.
1. Vulgar Slang. penis.
v.t.
2. Vulgar Slang. to have sexual intercourse with.
3. Slang. to victimize; cheat.
[1885–90]

dick

(dɪk)

n.
Slang. detective.
[1905–10; < Romani dik to look at, see < Hindi]

Dick

(dɪk)

n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dick - someone who is a detectivedick - someone who is a detective    
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
detective, police detective, tec, investigator - a police officer who investigates crimes
2.dick - obscene terms for penisdick - obscene terms for penis    
penis, phallus, member - the male organ of copulation (`member' is a euphemism)
dirty word, vulgarism, obscenity, smut, filth - an offensive or indecent word or phrase
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

dick

noun (Taboo slang) penis, cock (taboo slang), prick (taboo slang), member, tool (taboo slang), organ, wang (U.S. slang), knob (Brit. taboo slang), chopper (Brit. slang), plonker (slang), dong (slang), winkle (Brit. slang), joystick (slang), phallus, pecker (U.S. & Canad. taboo slang), John Thomas (taboo slang), weenie (U.S. slang), whang (U.S. slang), tadger (Brit. slang), schlong (U.S. slang), pizzle (archaic & dialect), willie or willy (Brit. informal) She remarked that most men think with their dicks, not their heads.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

dick

noun
Slang. A person whose work is investigating crimes or obtaining hidden evidence or information:
Informal: eye.
Slang: gumshoe.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
čurákšulin
pik
kaco
munntüra
kalukyrpämulkku
faszfaszfejpöcs
mentulapenisphallusverpa
pulă
snopp

dick

[dɪk] N
1. (US) → sabueso mf
2.polla f (Sp) , verga f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dick

[ˈdɪk] nbite f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dick

n
(inf: = detective) → Schnüffler(in) m(f) (inf); private dickPrivatdetektiv(in) m(f) ? clever Dick
(sl: = bastard) → Wichser m (sl)
(sl: = penis) → Schwanz m (sl)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

dick

[dɪk] n (fam!) (penis) → cazzo (fam!)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

dick

n (vulg, penis) pene m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rita Dicke, head of the OLC - Functional Coatings integrated business platform in the LANXESS Leather business unit.
Matthew Dicke, partner and IP Practice Lead at K&L Gates, US, focused his talk on Patent 2.0 and the process for international applications.
Karen Gilbert of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the landlord.<br />Lynn Dicke leased 1,156 square feet at 103 N.
Chemically mediated behaviors that reduce predation risk have received considerable attention among diverse taxonomic groups (for detailed reviews see Kats & Dill 1998; Dicke & Grostal 2001).
Dicke, "Mach's principle and a relativistic theory of gravitation," Physical Review A: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, vol.
The causal relation between consumption of bread and cereals and relapsing diarrhea was first recognized by Dutch pediatrician Willem K Dicke. A similar association was observed during the Second World War when chronic diarrhea patients improved during periods of food shortage in the Second World War as bread was replaced by unconventional, noncereal containing foods.[2],[3] Cereals implicated in this disease affliction were wheat, barley, rye, and oats.
Melissa Dicke, Secondary Mathematics Teacher, Newburgh Free Academy, Newburgh Enlarged City School District (NY)
To locate prey in natural habitats, entomophagous insects use numerous chemical cues emitted by host plants, alone or in association with pest (Vet and Dicke, 1992).
Their power comes from Sultan's deft layering of Masonite, linoleum, tar, and plaster that is used to represent the smoky depths of the subject matter that he conjures," notes Sarah Newman, the James Dicke Curator of Contemporary Art at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, who is coordinating the exhibition in Washington, D.C., where it is on view through Sept.
Known as "Der Dicke" (the "fat one"), he was indeed massive at 6 feet 4 inches tall and comfortably over 300 pounds (136kg).
Chinn will join Michael Dicke, partner and co-chair of the Securities Enforcement Group at Fenwick & West, and Helen Bergman Moure, principal of Lex Aperta, to shed light on how to navigate e-discovery requirements of federal investigations.