drongo

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Related to Dicrurus: Drongo

drongo

(ˈdrɒŋɡəʊ)
n, pl -gos
1. (Animals) Also called: drongo shrike any insectivorous songbird of the family Dicruridae, of the Old World tropics, having a glossy black plumage, a forked tail, and a stout bill
2. slang Austral and NZ a slow-witted person
3. (Military) informal Austral a new recruit in the Royal Australian Air Force
[C19: from Malagasy]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

drongo

n
(esp Austral pej inf: = person) → Schwachkopf m (pej inf)
(= bird)Drongo m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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###Dicruridae###Black Drongo Dicrurus macrocercus###YRR###LC###95###1.276367###0.108696###I
In addition to the wild duck species in the Anatidae family of birds, Joie Matillano of Western Philippines University (WPU) noted that there were also Oriental dwarf kingfishers (Ceyx erithaca); Blue-eared kingfishers (Alcedo meninting); Common flamebacks (Dinopium javanense); Hooded pittas (Pitta sordida); Common kingfishers (Alcedo atthis); Ashy-headed babblers (Malacocincla cinereiceps); Grey-cheeked bulbul (Alophoixus bres); Grey herons (Ardea cinerea); Great egrets (Ardea alba); Western osprey (Pandion haliaetus); Spangled drongo (Dicrurus bracteatus); and Pin-striped tit babblers (Mixornis gularis) that reside in the only freshwater lake in the province's mainland.
When food gets scarce, African birds called fork-tailed drongos (Dicrurus adsimiiis) watch for a meerkat or other forager to find desirable prey.
It was immediately apparent that it was a species of drongo Dicrurus sp.
Milan: Skira.: 90); and the birds on the horizontal malanggan panel in Figs 117-118 are representations of the New Ireland drongo (Dicrurus megarhynchus), not the frigate bird (cf.
Possible factors contributing toward the decline include degradation or loss of habitat due to development, agricultural activities, and naturally occurring events such as typhoons; avian disease; predation by nonnative rats (Rattus spp.) and the black drongo (Dicrurus macrocercus), an introduced bird species from Taiwan; and pesticides.
viridis, the Madagascar Bulbul Hypsipetes madagascariensis, and the Crested Drongo Dicrurus forficatus (Table 1).